inarticulate

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in·ar·tic·u·late

 (ĭn′är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Uttered without the use of normal words or syllables; incomprehensible as speech or language: "a cry ... that ... sank down into an inarticulate whine" (Jack London).
2. Unable to speak; speechless: inarticulate with astonishment.
3. Unable to speak with clarity or eloquence: an inarticulate debater.
4. Going unexpressed: inarticulate sorrow.
5. Biology Not having joints or segments.

in′ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
in′ar·tic′u·late·ness, in′ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

inarticulate

(ˌɪnɑːˈtɪkjʊlɪt)
adj
1. unable to express oneself fluently or clearly; incoherent
2. (of speech, language, etc) unclear or incomprehensible; unintelligible: inarticulate grunts.
3. unable to speak; dumb
4. unable to be expressed; unvoiced: inarticulate suffering.
5. (Biology) biology having no joints, segments, or articulation
ˌinarˈticulately adv
ˌinarˈticulateness, ˌinarˈticulacy n

in•ar•tic•u•late

(ˌɪn ɑrˈtɪk yə lɪt)

adj.
1. lacking the ability to express oneself, esp. in clear and effective speech: an inarticulate speaker.
2. unable to use articulate speech: inarticulate with rage.
3. not articulate; not uttered or emitted with expressive or intelligible modulations: the baby's inarticulate sounds.
4. not fully expressed or expressible.
5. Anat., Zool. not jointed; lacking joints.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin]
in`ar•tic′u•late•ly, adv.
in`ar•tic′u•late•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inarticulate - without or deprived of the use of speech or words; "inarticulate beasts"; "remained stupidly inarticulate and saying something noncommittal"; "inarticulate with rage"; "an inarticulate cry"
incommunicative, uncommunicative - not inclined to talk or give information or express opinions
articulate - expressing yourself easily or characterized by clear expressive language; "articulate speech"; "an articulate orator"; "articulate beings"

inarticulate

adjective
1. faltering, halting, hesitant, tongue-tied He was inarticulate and rather shy.
2. incoherent, incomprehensible, unintelligible, unclear, mumbled, muffled, indistinct, poorly spoken He made an inarticulate noise in the back of his throat.
incoherent clear, articulate, coherent, comprehensible, intelligible, well-spoken
3. mute, silent, dumb, unspoken, speechless, wordless, voiceless, unvoiced, unuttered extremes of anger, from inarticulate fury to mild irritation

inarticulate

adjective
1. Lacking the power or faculty of speech:
2. Temporarily unable or unwilling to speak, as from shock or fear:
Translations

inarticulate

[ˌɪnɑːˈtɪkjʊlɪt] ADJ [person] → con dificultad para expresarse; [speech] → mal pronunciado; [noise, sound] → inarticulado
he was inarticulate with ragede lo furioso que estaba no podía pronunciar palabra

inarticulate

[ˌɪnɑːrˈtɪkjʊlət] adj
[person] → qui s'exprime mal
to be inarticulate → avoir beaucoup de mal à s'exprimer
[speech] → indistinct(e)

inarticulate

adj
essayschlecht or unklar ausgedrückt, inartikuliert (geh); speech alsoschwerfällig; she’s very inarticulatesie kann sich kaum or nur schlecht ausdrücken; a brilliant but inarticulate scientistein glänzender, aber wenig wortgewandter Wissenschaftler; inarticulate with ragesprachlos vor Zorn; just a string of inarticulate gruntsnur eine Reihe unverständlicher Grunzlaute
(Zool) → nicht gegliedert

inarticulate

[ˌɪnɑːˈtɪkjʊlɪt] adj (person) → che non sa esprimersi, che si esprime male; (speech) → inarticolato/a, confuso/a

in·ar·tic·u·late

a. inarticulado-a, incapaz de articular palabras o sílabas.
References in periodicals archive ?
King uses this model of filmmaking and distribution as a basis for discussing mumblecore, a type of production characterized by "ultra-cheap DV aesthetics and a quite narrow focus on the everyway foibles and inarticulacies of a "twenty-something" post-college generation in the era of the text message, e-mail and YouTube" (122-3).
There was this kind of paradox, in that you had these hopeless petty crooks whose inarticulacies by some kind of alchemy became a kind of poetry.