inarticulacy


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in·ar·tic·u·late

 (ĭn′är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Uttered without the use of normal words or syllables; incomprehensible as speech or language: "a cry ... that ... sank down into an inarticulate whine" (Jack London).
2. Unable to speak; speechless: inarticulate with astonishment.
3. Unable to speak with clarity or eloquence: an inarticulate debater.
4. Going unexpressed: inarticulate sorrow.
5. Biology Not having joints or segments.

in′ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
in′ar·tic′u·late·ness, in′ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.
Translations

inarticulacy

n (form)Inartikuliertheit f (geh), → mangelnde Wortgewandtheit f; he was reduced to inarticulacyer konnte keine Worte mehr finden
References in periodicals archive ?
These evolved communities are, finally, worthy of attention and respect because they place individual subjects in a longer history, embed them in communal solidarity, and provide them with a cultural identity, thereby saving human beings from disorientation, social isolation, and inarticulacy (Nipperdey 5).
May resembles Heath in her curious mixture of inner confidence and inarticulacy.
It is possible that the extreme inarticulacy and evident hollowness of Theresa May in her role as leader was not simply a deficit of character and charisma, but rather followed from the internal contradictions of the political position she had adopted.
puzzling in their depth, variety, and inarticulacy.
Burton's violence, inarticulacy and immobility as well as the narrative's lack of compassion for his fate.
Milanku's funny inarticulacy in this French world, these French sentences ("Oui"), is rendered in the midst of this other voice, a mischievous and utterly serious Kunderization of language that asserts and doubts all at once.
11) They include: a principled inarticulacy or sincerity, in an increasingly instrumental world (as when Carlyle reports to Emerson "an observation of mine, which indeed I find is hundreds of years old, that a stammering man is never a worthless one"); (12) a curious channel for prophecy in a desacralized public sphere (see Coventry Patmore's "The holders of the Truth in Verity / Are people of a harsh and stammering tongue
One British brother is the nominal love interest, albeit so dorky and un-threatening he can barely stammer out his own name (bumbling inarticulacy is clearly the new manly, see also Benjy in Pitch Perfect 2); the other British brother is around 12 years old, very polite, and carries a guide to San Francisco everywhere he goes which is 'obviously' adorable (the guidebook turns out to be useful when technology breaks down, just as mobile phones give way to old-fashioned land lines).
He and his close comrades--Tom Jenkinson, aka Squarepusher; Luke Vibert, aka Wagon Christ; and various mates on James's own independent Rephlex label--disdained media probing, countering earnest discourse with studied inarticulacy.
Stoddard reduces the exuberant, passionate, and inarticulate outbursts that early on defied conventions of intimacy to a different kind of inarticulacy, one defined by familial and romantic conventions of intimacy, in the novel's conclusion.
He seems to have the prospects of being a leader of those who would oppose the norm, but he does not really live up to this image as his inarticulacy counts hugely against him.