incandescence


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in·can·des·cence

 (ĭn′kən-dĕs′əns)
n.
1. The emission of visible light by a hot object.
2. The light emitted by an incandescent object.
3. A high degree of emotion, intensity, or brilliance.

incandescence

(ˌɪnkænˈdɛsəns) or

incandescency

n
1. (General Physics) the emission of light by a body as a consequence of raising its temperature. Compare luminescence
2. (General Physics) the light produced by raising the temperature of a body

in•can•des•cence

(ˌɪn kənˈdɛs əns)

n.
1. the emission of visible light by a body, caused by its high temperature.
2. the light produced by such an emission.
[1650–60]

incandescence

The emission of light by a body which is strongly heated.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incandescence - the phenomenon of light emission by a body as its temperature is raised
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
2.incandescence - light from heat
brightness level, luminance, luminosity, luminousness, brightness, light - the quality of being luminous; emitting or reflecting light; "its luminosity is measured relative to that of our sun"
Translations

incandescence

[ˌɪnkænˈdesns] Nincandescencia f

incandescence

n(Weiß)glühen nt, → (Weiß)glut f; (fig)Leuchten nt, → Strahlen nt

incandescence

[ˌɪnkænˈdɛsns] n (frm) → incandescenza
References in classic literature ?
Lights," commanded Master Freddie; and the butler pressed a button, and a flood of brilliant incandescence streamed from above, half-blinding Jurgis.
The incandescence, so to call it, was on the left side.
Flames require the oxygen of the air to feed upon and cannot be developed under water; but streams of lava, having in themselves the principles of their incandescence, can attain a white heat, fight vigorously against the liquid element, and turn it to vapour by contact.
It was a reddish incandescence which increased by degrees, a decided proof that the projectile was shifting toward it and not falling normally on the surface of the moon.
I still love the smell of cordite, the incandescence of burning magnesium, the whoosh and crack of the big rockets, and even the simple yet mesmerising enjoyment of writing one's name in the air with a Sparkler.
The incandescence of Forever One(TM) moissanite is astonishing.
Most notably, she is able to achieve a nearly subliminal incandescence through a medieval method of applying gold leaf to the canvas before painting.
This light may either be produced by incandescence, or by particles which are too large to polarise the light in the act of scattering it.
Incandescence will be performing an Abba tribute and there will be a "Sound of Music" and "Mary Poppins" sing-along.
Beginning his article with the 1809 epigraph above, articulating Blake's concept of art centred on invention and visionary conception, Archer ended it in his own words: "In the best art there is an inescapable element of strangeness, the sense of a novel wonder, a mystery burning at the heart of life, and it is this strangeness, this incandescence which above all the painting of Mithila transmits.
Keep yourself from the fire incandescence and make you prepared to fight and destroy it from the meekness.
O'Leary narrates the life cycle of existence from "an unatomized sundering of sames" to an "organized whole in the process of fulfillment," an odyssey and Archimedean sensibility deriving from Teilhard's theory that human consciousness exists in nature as an incandescence, which en masse produces a psychic brightness that sheathes the planet in a "phosphorescence of thought.