incant

in·cant

 (ĭn-kănt′)
tr.v. in·cant·ed, in·cant·ing, in·cants
To chant or intone (ritual or magic words).

[Latin incantāre; see enchant.]

incant

(ɪnˈkænt)
vb
to utter (incantations)to summon up by incantationto enchant
References in periodicals archive ?
This incant drilling operations at both launch points had to use every available inch of the 40-foot wide easement," said Lamb.
There is no magic word to incant, no lock to fumble with, and no key to turn.
When they incant the chorus, I think I can believe now in the sin I've done, it sounds like heartbreak, but really it's a testament to devotion as love.
Unfortunately for Chinaglia, He went to St Mary's Catholic the courts didn't forget it and school incant onand played football he is being prosecuted in his for Cardiff schools, joining Swansea absence in Rome, with the Town as an apprentice in 1962.
And the DD devotees gather to incant possibly the worst line in the history of cinema, 'Nobody puts Baby in a corner.
Defendants nevertheless incant the mantra of due process in these cases, as they often do when an error that has no palpable constitutional reverberations is nevertheless generically claimed to have deprived them of the minimum process required for a fair (that is, reliable) trial.
Too often in this book, we can't help wondering why Kaplan goes to so much trouble to reconstruct this story, only to incant its essentially "obscure and unfathomable" nature (70).
We incant the phrase regularly during an accident investigation.
Then they incant some hard-bitten phrases Learned by heart after they
The Citizens United dissenters rightly highlight these inequalities in political access and power, while the majority largely overlooks them and incants bromides about how a key precept of our First Amendment tradition is that government may not address such inequalities through seeking to "level the playing field" of political speech.