incantation

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in·can·ta·tion

 (ĭn′kăn-tā′shən)
n.
1. Ritual recitation of verbal charms or spells to produce a magic effect.
2.
a. A formula used in ritual recitation; a verbal charm or spell.
b. A conventionalized utterance repeated without thought or aptness; a formula: the pious incantations of the administration.

[Middle English incantacioun, from Old French incantation, from Late Latin incantātiō, incantātiōn-, spell, from Latin incantātus, past participle of incantāre, to enchant; see enchant.]

in′can·ta′tion·al adj.
in·can′ta·to′ry (-tə-tôr′ē) adj.

incantation

(ˌɪnkænˈteɪʃən)
n
1. ritual recitation of magic words or sounds
2. the formulaic words or sounds used; a magic spell
[C14: from Late Latin incantātiō an enchanting, from incantāre to repeat magic formulas, from Latin, from in-2 + cantāre to sing; see enchant]
ˌincanˈtational adj

in•can•ta•tion

(ˌɪn kænˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the chanting or uttering of words purporting to have magical power.
2. the formula employed; spell.
3. repetitious words used to heighten an effect.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin incantātiō, derivative of Latin incantā(re) to put a spell on, bewitch; see enchant]
in`can•ta′tion•al, in•can′ta•to`ry (-təˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incantation - a ritual recitation of words or sounds believed to have a magical effectincantation - a ritual recitation of words or sounds believed to have a magical effect
magic spell, magical spell, charm, spell - a verbal formula believed to have magical force; "he whispered a spell as he moved his hands"; "inscribed around its base is a charm in Balinese"
invocation - an incantation used in conjuring or summoning a devil

incantation

noun chant, spell, charm, formula, invocation, hex (U.S. & Canad. informal), abracadabra, conjuration huddled shapes whispering strange incantations
Translations
تَعْويذَه، رُقيَه
zaklínadlozaříkávání
trylleformular
varázsige
særingaròula
burtažodžiai
buramvārdi
zariekať

incantation

[ˌɪnkænˈteɪʃən] Nconjuro m, ensalmo m

incantation

nZauber(spruch) m, → Zauberformel f; (= act)Beschwörung f

incantation

[ˌɪnkænˈteɪʃn] nincantesimo

incantation

(inkӕnˈteiʃən) noun
words said or sung as a spell.
References in classic literature ?
Two or three individuals hinted that the man of skill, during his Indian captivity, had enlarged his medical attainments by joining in the incantations of the savage priests, who were universally acknowledged to be powerful enchanters, often performing seemingly miraculous cures by their skill in the black art.
If you buried a marble with certain necessary incantations, and left it alone a fortnight, and then opened the place with the incantation he had just used, you would find that all the marbles you had ever lost had gathered themselves together there, meantime, no matter how widely they had been separated.
After the morning's incantations Colin sometimes gave them Magic lectures.
Not, of course, the fear of war itself, which, in the evolution of sentiments and ideas, has come to be regarded at last as a half-mystic and glorious ceremony with certain fashionable rites and preliminary incantations, wherein the conception of its true nature has been lost.
Anyone witnessing the scene thus lighted up by fire, lantern, and the reflection of Wolfert's red mantle, might have mistaken the little doctor for some foul magician, busied in his incantations, and the grizzly- headed negro for some swart goblin obedient to his commands.
But no translation can give the effect of it, or the yelping scorn the Four threw into every word of it, as they heard the trees crash when the men hastily climbed up into the branches, and Buldeo began repeating incantations and charms.
Scattered also among their pale-faced enemies were the Indian priests, or powwows, who had often scared their native forest with more hideous incantations than any known to English witchcraft.
When Socrates, in Charmides, tells us that the soul is cured of its maladies by certain incantations, and that these incantations are beautiful reasons, from which temperance is generated in souls; when Plato calls the world an animal; and Timaeus affirms that the plants also are animals; or affirms a man to be a heavenly tree, growing with his root, which is his head, upward; and, as George Chapman, following him, writes,--
Thereupon the sorceries and incantations commenced; the "rain-makers," who pretend to have control over the clouds, invoked the storms and the "stone-showers," as the blacks call hail, to their aid.
We did not know what scrambled eggs were, and we fancied that it must be some Red Indian or Sandwich Islands sort of dish that required dances and incantations for its proper cooking.
Clacton to enchanted people in a bewitched tower, with the spiders' webs looping across the corners of the room, and all the tools of the necromancer's craft at hand; for so aloof and unreal and apart from the normal world did they seem to her, in the house of innumerable typewriters, murmuring their incantations and concocting their drugs, and flinging their frail spiders' webs over the torrent of life which rushed down the streets outside.
As to his religious notions-- why, as Voltaire said, incantations will destroy a flock of sheep if administered with a certain quantity of arsenic.