incarcerate

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in·car·cer·ate

 (ĭn-kär′sə-rāt′)
tr.v. in·car·cer·at·ed, in·car·cer·at·ing, in·car·cer·ates
1. To put in a prison or jail.
2. To shut in; confine.

[Medieval Latin incarcerāre, incarcerāt- : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin carcer, prison.]

in·car′cer·a′tion n.
in·car′cer·a′tor n.

incarcerate

(ɪnˈkɑːsəˌreɪt)
vb
(tr) to confine or imprison
[C16: from Medieval Latin incarcerāre, from Latin in-2 + carcer prison]
inˌcarcerˈation n
inˈcarcerˌator n

in•car•cer•ate

(ɪnˈkɑr səˌreɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to imprison; confine.
2. to enclose; constrict closely.
[1520–30; < Medieval Latin incarcerāre to imprison]
in•car`cer•a′tion, n.
in•car′cer•a`tive, adj.

incarcerate


Past participle: incarcerated
Gerund: incarcerating

Imperative
incarcerate
incarcerate
Present
I incarcerate
you incarcerate
he/she/it incarcerates
we incarcerate
you incarcerate
they incarcerate
Preterite
I incarcerated
you incarcerated
he/she/it incarcerated
we incarcerated
you incarcerated
they incarcerated
Present Continuous
I am incarcerating
you are incarcerating
he/she/it is incarcerating
we are incarcerating
you are incarcerating
they are incarcerating
Present Perfect
I have incarcerated
you have incarcerated
he/she/it has incarcerated
we have incarcerated
you have incarcerated
they have incarcerated
Past Continuous
I was incarcerating
you were incarcerating
he/she/it was incarcerating
we were incarcerating
you were incarcerating
they were incarcerating
Past Perfect
I had incarcerated
you had incarcerated
he/she/it had incarcerated
we had incarcerated
you had incarcerated
they had incarcerated
Future
I will incarcerate
you will incarcerate
he/she/it will incarcerate
we will incarcerate
you will incarcerate
they will incarcerate
Future Perfect
I will have incarcerated
you will have incarcerated
he/she/it will have incarcerated
we will have incarcerated
you will have incarcerated
they will have incarcerated
Future Continuous
I will be incarcerating
you will be incarcerating
he/she/it will be incarcerating
we will be incarcerating
you will be incarcerating
they will be incarcerating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been incarcerating
you have been incarcerating
he/she/it has been incarcerating
we have been incarcerating
you have been incarcerating
they have been incarcerating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been incarcerating
you will have been incarcerating
he/she/it will have been incarcerating
we will have been incarcerating
you will have been incarcerating
they will have been incarcerating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been incarcerating
you had been incarcerating
he/she/it had been incarcerating
we had been incarcerating
you had been incarcerating
they had been incarcerating
Conditional
I would incarcerate
you would incarcerate
he/she/it would incarcerate
we would incarcerate
you would incarcerate
they would incarcerate
Past Conditional
I would have incarcerated
you would have incarcerated
he/she/it would have incarcerated
we would have incarcerated
you would have incarcerated
they would have incarcerated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.incarcerate - lock up or confine, in or as in a jail; "The suspects were imprisoned without trial"; "the murderer was incarcerated for the rest of his life"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
detain, confine - deprive of freedom; take into confinement

incarcerate

verb imprison, confine, detain, lock up, restrict, restrain, intern, send down (Brit.), impound, coop up, throw in jail, put under lock and key, immure, jail or gaol It can cost $50,000 to incarcerate a prisoner for a year.

incarcerate

verb
To put in jail:
Translations

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːsəreɪt] VTencarcelar

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːrsəreɪt] vtincarcérer
to be incarcerated → être incarcéré(e)

incarcerate

vteinkerkern

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːsəˌreɪt] vt (frm) → incarcerare
References in classic literature ?
Wherefore, the large stone and brick cells, lined with double and triple-tiered bunks, in which the Law is wont to incarcerate him, he calls the Hobo.
The CYA incarcerates youthful offenders convicted of violent crimes such as murder, robbery, rape and kidnapping.
We are surpassed only by Russia, which incarcerates roughly one of every 146 citizens.