incarcerate

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in·car·cer·ate

 (ĭn-kär′sə-rāt′)
tr.v. in·car·cer·at·ed, in·car·cer·at·ing, in·car·cer·ates
1. To put in a prison or jail.
2. To shut in; confine.

[Medieval Latin incarcerāre, incarcerāt- : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin carcer, prison.]

in·car′cer·a′tion n.
in·car′cer·a′tor n.

incarcerate

(ɪnˈkɑːsəˌreɪt)
vb
(tr) to confine or imprison
[C16: from Medieval Latin incarcerāre, from Latin in-2 + carcer prison]
inˌcarcerˈation n
inˈcarcerˌator n

in•car•cer•ate

(ɪnˈkɑr səˌreɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to imprison; confine.
2. to enclose; constrict closely.
[1520–30; < Medieval Latin incarcerāre to imprison]
in•car`cer•a′tion, n.
in•car′cer•a`tive, adj.

incarcerate


Past participle: incarcerated
Gerund: incarcerating

Imperative
incarcerate
incarcerate
Present
I incarcerate
you incarcerate
he/she/it incarcerates
we incarcerate
you incarcerate
they incarcerate
Preterite
I incarcerated
you incarcerated
he/she/it incarcerated
we incarcerated
you incarcerated
they incarcerated
Present Continuous
I am incarcerating
you are incarcerating
he/she/it is incarcerating
we are incarcerating
you are incarcerating
they are incarcerating
Present Perfect
I have incarcerated
you have incarcerated
he/she/it has incarcerated
we have incarcerated
you have incarcerated
they have incarcerated
Past Continuous
I was incarcerating
you were incarcerating
he/she/it was incarcerating
we were incarcerating
you were incarcerating
they were incarcerating
Past Perfect
I had incarcerated
you had incarcerated
he/she/it had incarcerated
we had incarcerated
you had incarcerated
they had incarcerated
Future
I will incarcerate
you will incarcerate
he/she/it will incarcerate
we will incarcerate
you will incarcerate
they will incarcerate
Future Perfect
I will have incarcerated
you will have incarcerated
he/she/it will have incarcerated
we will have incarcerated
you will have incarcerated
they will have incarcerated
Future Continuous
I will be incarcerating
you will be incarcerating
he/she/it will be incarcerating
we will be incarcerating
you will be incarcerating
they will be incarcerating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been incarcerating
you have been incarcerating
he/she/it has been incarcerating
we have been incarcerating
you have been incarcerating
they have been incarcerating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been incarcerating
you will have been incarcerating
he/she/it will have been incarcerating
we will have been incarcerating
you will have been incarcerating
they will have been incarcerating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been incarcerating
you had been incarcerating
he/she/it had been incarcerating
we had been incarcerating
you had been incarcerating
they had been incarcerating
Conditional
I would incarcerate
you would incarcerate
he/she/it would incarcerate
we would incarcerate
you would incarcerate
they would incarcerate
Past Conditional
I would have incarcerated
you would have incarcerated
he/she/it would have incarcerated
we would have incarcerated
you would have incarcerated
they would have incarcerated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.incarcerate - lock up or confine, in or as in a jail; "The suspects were imprisoned without trial"; "the murderer was incarcerated for the rest of his life"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
detain, confine - deprive of freedom; take into confinement

incarcerate

verb imprison, confine, detain, lock up, restrict, restrain, intern, send down (Brit.), impound, coop up, throw in jail, put under lock and key, immure, jail or gaol It can cost $50,000 to incarcerate a prisoner for a year.

incarcerate

verb
To put in jail:
Translations

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːsəreɪt] VTencarcelar

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːrsəreɪt] vtincarcérer
to be incarcerated → être incarcéré(e)

incarcerate

vteinkerkern

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːsəˌreɪt] vt (frm) → incarcerare
References in periodicals archive ?
DiIulio and Piehl emphasized that drug dealers are easily replaced, so "the best estimate of the incapacitation effect (number of drug sales prevented by incarcerating a drug dealer) is zero.
For $75,000 a year [the cost of incarcerating one juvenile in a secure facility]," Miller points out, "you could hire two full-time professionals to devote their entire work week to that juvenile.
Additionally, the authors reported a trend of incarcerating youth under age 18, who have committed serious crimes, with adults.
What other options are there to incarcerating kids -- are prevention and intervention reasonable and viable alternatives?
The resources wasted on incarcerating an essentially noncriminal population could have treated drug-addicted women and saved countless families from the breakup and pains of incarceration imposed by a less compassionate drug policy.