incarnadine


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in·car·na·dine

 (ĭn-kär′nə-dīn′, -dēn′, -dĭn)
adj.
1. Of a fleshy pink color.
2. Blood-red.
tr.v. in·car·na·dined, in·car·na·din·ing, in·car·na·dines
To make incarnadine, especially to redden.

[French incarnadin, from Italian incarnadino, variant of incarnatino, diminutive of incarnato : in-, in (from Latin; see in-2) + carne, flesh (from Latin carō, carn-; see incarnate).]

incarnadine

(ɪnˈkɑːnəˌdaɪn)
vb
(tr) to tinge or stain with red
adj
(Colours) of a pinkish or reddish colour similar to that of flesh or blood
[C16: from French incarnadin flesh-coloured, from Italian, from Late Latin incarnātus made flesh, incarnate]

in•car•na•dine

(ɪnˈkɑr nəˌdaɪn, -dɪn, -ˌdin)

adj., v. -dined, -din•ing. adj.
1. blood-red; crimson.
2. flesh-colored.
v.t.
3. to make incarnadine.
[1585–95; < Middle French, feminine of incarnadin flesh-colored < Italian incarnatino=incarnat(o) made flesh (see incarnate) + -ino -ine1]

incarnadine

- Can mean "flesh-colored or pink," but also "crimson, blood-red."
See also related terms for pink.

incarnadine


Past participle: incarnadined
Gerund: incarnadining

Imperative
incarnadine
incarnadine
Present
I incarnadine
you incarnadine
he/she/it incarnadines
we incarnadine
you incarnadine
they incarnadine
Preterite
I incarnadined
you incarnadined
he/she/it incarnadined
we incarnadined
you incarnadined
they incarnadined
Present Continuous
I am incarnadining
you are incarnadining
he/she/it is incarnadining
we are incarnadining
you are incarnadining
they are incarnadining
Present Perfect
I have incarnadined
you have incarnadined
he/she/it has incarnadined
we have incarnadined
you have incarnadined
they have incarnadined
Past Continuous
I was incarnadining
you were incarnadining
he/she/it was incarnadining
we were incarnadining
you were incarnadining
they were incarnadining
Past Perfect
I had incarnadined
you had incarnadined
he/she/it had incarnadined
we had incarnadined
you had incarnadined
they had incarnadined
Future
I will incarnadine
you will incarnadine
he/she/it will incarnadine
we will incarnadine
you will incarnadine
they will incarnadine
Future Perfect
I will have incarnadined
you will have incarnadined
he/she/it will have incarnadined
we will have incarnadined
you will have incarnadined
they will have incarnadined
Future Continuous
I will be incarnadining
you will be incarnadining
he/she/it will be incarnadining
we will be incarnadining
you will be incarnadining
they will be incarnadining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been incarnadining
you have been incarnadining
he/she/it has been incarnadining
we have been incarnadining
you have been incarnadining
they have been incarnadining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been incarnadining
you will have been incarnadining
he/she/it will have been incarnadining
we will have been incarnadining
you will have been incarnadining
they will have been incarnadining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been incarnadining
you had been incarnadining
he/she/it had been incarnadining
we had been incarnadining
you had been incarnadining
they had been incarnadining
Conditional
I would incarnadine
you would incarnadine
he/she/it would incarnadine
we would incarnadine
you would incarnadine
they would incarnadine
Past Conditional
I would have incarnadined
you would have incarnadined
he/she/it would have incarnadined
we would have incarnadined
you would have incarnadined
they would have incarnadined
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.incarnadine - make flesh-colored
color, color in, colorise, colorize, colour in, colourise, colourize, colour - add color to; "The child colored the drawings"; "Fall colored the trees"; "colorize black and white film"
References in periodicals archive ?
We are the hour's cortege, incarnadine in the glow of
No, This my hand will rather the multitudinous seas incarnadine Making the green one red, remarked Shakespeares Macbeth consumed with guilt, manifesting his emotional conundrum shortly after murdering King Duncan.
V(vb/adj): bowed (bent), incarnadine (dye flesh-coloured, an old
Also worth mentioning are recent collections by believers, agnostics, and even self-identified atheists, such as Jericho Brown's The New Testament, Alicia Ostriker's The Old Woman, the Tulip, and the Dog, Carrie Fountain's Instant Winner, Fanny Howe's Second Childhood, Danez Smith's [insert] boy, Mark Wunderlich's The Earth Avails, and Mary Szybist's Incarnadine.
The artists entire suite of Philippine Madonna is an alternation of pastel pinks and blues, with occasional flashes of incarnadine reds.
That outpouring of flowers from an upper window, washing down like a sea incarnadine around the white walls of the medieval fortress.
Mary Szybist's Incarnadine, recent winner of the National Book Award, announces its location in the realm of creative doubt with its epigraph from Simone Weil's Gravity and Grace: "The mysteries of faith are degraded if they are made into an object of affirmation and negation, when in reality they should be an object of contemplation.
Indeed, anyone who challenged the proceeding, either from a legal or a humanitarian standpoint, laid himself open to the suspicion of being to some extent incarnadine.
Greene, Incarnadine, the True Memoirs of Count Dracula, 2009; C.
Scholarly papers were published, and much of the British press again fell over itself to promote Dawson's claims, which they presented alongside their reports of the incarnadine shambles of the Gallipoli landings.
Similarly, the two artists share a penchant for red: Chardin's rusts and rubies, in the supple leathers of a musette or in a slab of salmon, contrast with the incarnadine palette in Bresson's last two films, the apocalyptic The Devil, Probably (1977) and L'Argent.
Hence, only too late does Macbeth come to the Senecan realization that not even "great Neptune's ocean" can "wash this blood" clean from his hand: "No, this my hand will rather / The multitudinous seas incarnadine, / Making the green one red" (II.