incendiary


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Related to incendiary: Incendiary device

in·cen·di·ar·y

 (ĭn-sĕn′dē-ĕr′ē)
adj.
1.
a. Causing or designed to cause fires: an incendiary device.
b. Of or containing chemicals that produce intensely hot fire when exploded: an incendiary bomb.
c. Intentionally started or set: an incendiary fire.
2. Tending to arouse strong emotion or conflict; inflammatory: an incendiary speech.
3. Causing a strong burning sensation in the mouth; very hot: incendiary wasabi.
n. pl. in·cen·di·ar·ies
1. An incendiary bomb, bullet, or device.
2. A person who intentionally starts a fire with the purpose of causing damage or injury.
3. One who creates or stirs up conflict; an agitator.

[Middle English, from Latin incendiārius, from incendium, fire, from incendere, to set on fire; see incense1.]

in·cen′di·a·rism (-ə-rĭz′əm) n.

incendiary

(ɪnˈsɛndɪərɪ)
adj
1. (Law) of or relating to the illegal burning of property, goods, etc
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) tending to create strife, violence, etc; inflammatory
3. (Chemistry) (of a substance) capable of catching fire, causing fires, or burning readily
n, pl -aries
4. (Law) a person who illegally sets fire to property, goods, etc; arsonist
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (esp formerly) a person who stirs up civil strife, violence, etc, for political reasons; agitator
6. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) Also called: incendiary bomb a bomb that is designed to start fires
7. (Chemistry) an incendiary substance, such as phosphorus
[C17: from Latin incendiārius setting alight, from incendium fire, from incendere to kindle]

in•cen•di•ar•y

(ɪnˈsɛn diˌɛr i)

adj., n., pl. -ar•ies. adj.
1. used or adapted for setting property on fire: incendiary bombs.
2. of or pertaining to the criminal setting on fire of property.
3. tending to arouse strife, sedition, etc.; inflammatory: incendiary speeches.
n.
4. a person who deliberately sets fire to property.
5. a device containing napalm, thermite, or the like, that burns with an intense heat.
6. a person who stirs up strife.
[1600–10; < Latin incendi(um) a fire]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incendiary - a criminal who illegally sets fire to propertyincendiary - a criminal who illegally sets fire to property
barnburner - someone who burns down a barn
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
2.incendiary - a bomb that is designed to start firesincendiary - a bomb that is designed to start fires; is most effective against flammable targets (such as fuel)
bomb - an explosive device fused to explode under specific conditions
Adj.1.incendiary - involving deliberate burning of property; "an incendiary fire"
2.incendiary - arousing to action or rebellion
provocative - serving or tending to provoke, excite, or stimulate; stimulating discussion or exciting controversy; "a provocative remark"; "a provocative smile"; "provocative Irish tunes which...compel the hearers to dance"- Anthony Trollope
3.incendiary - capable of catching fire spontaneously or causing fires or burning readily; "an incendiary agent"; "incendiary bombs"
combustible - capable of igniting and burning

incendiary

adjective inflammatory, provocative, subversive, seditious, rabble-rousing, dissentious making incendiary remarks
Translations
حارِق مُتَعَمَّدحارِق، مُشْعِلقُنْبُلَه مُحْرِقَه
zápalnýžhářžhářskýbuřičský-ka
brand-brandbombebrandstifter
lietsovapalopommisytyketulenarka
gyújtóbombagyújtogató
brennuvarguríkveikju-íkveikjusprengja
padegamasispadegamoji bombapadegėjas
aizdedzinošsdegbumbaļaunprātīgs dedzinātājs
bombaprowokacyjnywichrzycielskizapalającazapalający
podpaľačzápalná bombazápalný
kundakçıyangın bombasıyangın çıkaran

incendiary

[ɪnˈsendɪərɪ]
A. ADJ [bomb, device, speech] → incendiario
B. N
1. (= bomb) → bomba f incendiaria
2. (= arsonist) → incendiario/a m/f, pirómano/a m/f

incendiary

[ɪnˈsɛndiəri]
adj [bomb] → incendiaire
n (= bomb) → bombe f incendiaireincendiary device ndispositif m incendiaire

incendiary

adj
(lit)Brand-; incendiary attackBrandanschlag m; incendiary bombBrandbombe f
(fig) speechaufwiegelnd, aufhetzend
n
(= bomb)Brandbombe f
(= person) (lit)Brandstifter(in) m(f); (fig)Aufrührer(in) m(f), → Unruhestifter(in) m(f)

incendiary

[ɪnˈsɛndɪərɪ]
1. adjincendiario/a
2. n (bomb) → ordigno incendiario

incendiary

(inˈsendiəri) adjective
used for setting (a building etc) on fire. an incendiary bomb.
nounplural inˈcendiaries
1. a person who sets fire to buildings etc unlawfully.
2. an incendiary bomb.
References in classic literature ?
Later, he learned that Erik had found, all prepared for him, a secret passage, long known to himself alone and contrived at the time of the Paris Commune to allow the jailers to convey their prisoners straight to the dungeons that had been constructed for them in the cellars; for the Federates had occupied the opera-house immediately after the eighteenth of March and had made a starting-place right at the top for their Mongolfier balloons, which carried their incendiary proclamations to the departments, and a state prison right at the bottom.
An incendiary the burden of whose song was his intention to assassinate me.
Now, you are right, my dear Louise, because after these words, `Monsieur Raoul,' others may be put so significant and so incendiary as to cause Madame de Saint-Remy to burst out into fire and flames
It was a wry-necked matter of unauthorized and incendiary correspondence between a person who claimed to be the ultimate authority in all matters of the Mohammedan religion throughout the world, and a younger member of a royal house who had been brought to book for kidnapping women within British territory.
They have decided at last that we are a battalion of incendiary, blood-thirsty Garibaldians in disguise
The officer sends for Auersperg; these gentlemen embrace the officers, crack jokes, sit on the cannon, and meanwhile a French battalion gets to the bridge unobserved, flings the bags of incendiary material into the water, and approaches the tete-de-pont.
Coarse slander, fire, tar and feathers and the gibbet, the youth may freely bring home to his mind and with what sweetness of temper he can, and inquire how fast he can fix his sense of duty, braving such penalties, whenever it may please the next newspaper and a sufficient number of his neighbors to pronounce his opinions incendiary.
Mary was too angry with her husband, because of the impending strike and his incendiary utterances, to hold conversation with Saxon, and the latter, bepuzzled, listened to the conflicting opinions of the men.
Obscurantism is better than the light of incendiary torches.
did work a change and the spell being broken nothing could be expected to take place without weaving it afresh which various circumstances have combined to prevent of which perhaps not the least powerful was that it was not to be, I am not prepared to say that if it had been agreeable to Arthur and had brought itself about naturally in the first instance I should not have been very glad being of a lively disposition and moped at home where papa undoubtedly is the most aggravating of his sex and not improved since having been cut down by the hand of the Incendiary into something of which I never saw the counterpart in all my life but jealousy is not my character nor ill-will though many faults.
And there, Mr Pancks, (destined to be chief clerk to Doyce and Clennam, and afterwards partner in the house), sinking the Incendiary in the peaceful friend, looked in at the door to see it done, with Flora gallantly supported on one arm and Maggy on the other, and a back-ground of John Chivery and father and other turnkeys who had run round for the moment, deserting the parent Marshalsea for its happy child.
The process requiring that Twemlow shall, for two hours after the application, allow his hair to stick upright and dry gradually, he is in an appropriate state for the receipt of startling intelligence; looking equally like the Monument on Fish Street Hill, and King Priam on a certain incendiary occasion not wholly unknown as a neat point from the classics.