inchoate


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in·cho·ate

 (ĭn-kō′ĭt, -āt)
adj.
1. Being in a beginning or early stage; incipient: "The country was developing an incipient national art, an inchoate national literature" (Jay Winik).
2. Imperfectly formed or developed; disordered or incoherent: "A prophet must be a good public speaker, someone who can transform inchoate rage into eloquent diatribe" (David Leavitt).

[Latin inchoātus, past participle of inchoāre, to begin, alteration of incohāre : in-, in; see in-2 + cohum, strap from yoke to harness.]

in·cho′ate·ly adv.
in·cho′ate·ness n.

inchoate

adj
1. just beginning; incipient
2. undeveloped; immature; rudimentary
3. (Law) (of a legal document, promissory note, etc) in an uncompleted state; not yet made specific or valid
vb (tr)
to begin
[C16: from Latin incohāre to make a beginning, literally: to hitch up, from in-2 + cohum yokestrap]
inˈchoately adv
inˈchoateness n
ˌinchoˈation n
inchoative adj

in•cho•ate

(ɪnˈkoʊ ɪt, -eɪt; esp. Brit. ˈɪn koʊˌeɪt)

adj.
1. not yet completed or fully developed.
2. just begun; incipient.
[1525–35; < Latin inchoātus, variant of incohātus, past participle of incohāre to begin, start work on]
in•cho′ate•ly, adv.
in•cho′ate•ness, n.

inchoate


Past participle: inchoated
Gerund: inchoating

Imperative
inchoate
inchoate
Present
I inchoate
you inchoate
he/she/it inchoates
we inchoate
you inchoate
they inchoate
Preterite
I inchoated
you inchoated
he/she/it inchoated
we inchoated
you inchoated
they inchoated
Present Continuous
I am inchoating
you are inchoating
he/she/it is inchoating
we are inchoating
you are inchoating
they are inchoating
Present Perfect
I have inchoated
you have inchoated
he/she/it has inchoated
we have inchoated
you have inchoated
they have inchoated
Past Continuous
I was inchoating
you were inchoating
he/she/it was inchoating
we were inchoating
you were inchoating
they were inchoating
Past Perfect
I had inchoated
you had inchoated
he/she/it had inchoated
we had inchoated
you had inchoated
they had inchoated
Future
I will inchoate
you will inchoate
he/she/it will inchoate
we will inchoate
you will inchoate
they will inchoate
Future Perfect
I will have inchoated
you will have inchoated
he/she/it will have inchoated
we will have inchoated
you will have inchoated
they will have inchoated
Future Continuous
I will be inchoating
you will be inchoating
he/she/it will be inchoating
we will be inchoating
you will be inchoating
they will be inchoating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been inchoating
you have been inchoating
he/she/it has been inchoating
we have been inchoating
you have been inchoating
they have been inchoating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been inchoating
you will have been inchoating
he/she/it will have been inchoating
we will have been inchoating
you will have been inchoating
they will have been inchoating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been inchoating
you had been inchoating
he/she/it had been inchoating
we had been inchoating
you had been inchoating
they had been inchoating
Conditional
I would inchoate
you would inchoate
he/she/it would inchoate
we would inchoate
you would inchoate
they would inchoate
Past Conditional
I would have inchoated
you would have inchoated
he/she/it would have inchoated
we would have inchoated
you would have inchoated
they would have inchoated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inchoate - only partly in existence; imperfectly formed; "incipient civil disorder"; "an incipient tumor"; "a vague inchoate idea"
early - being or occurring at an early stage of development; "in an early stage"; "early forms of life"; "early man"; "an early computer"

inchoate

(Formal)
adjective
1. incipient, beginning, nascent, inceptive The dispute threatens to smash the inchoate government to fragments.
2. undeveloped, elementary, immature, imperfect, embryonic, rudimentary, formless, unformed His prose is every bit as inchoate as the wilderness in which he travels.

inchoate

adjective
Having no distinct shape:
Translations

inchoate

[ˈɪnkəʊeɪt] ADJ [idea] → que no ha tomado forma definitiva; [anger] → inexpresado

inchoate

adj (liter)unausgeformt
References in classic literature ?
Perchance, amid their proper element of smoke, which eddied forth from the ill-constructed chimney, the ghosts of departed cook-maids looked wonderingly on, or peeped down the great breadth of the flue, despising the simplicity of the projected meal, yet ineffectually pining to thrust their shadowy hands into each inchoate dish.
In the deep shadow of the tree there was a deeper shadow yet, black, inchoate, vague--a crouching form full of savage vigor and menace.
Then his eyes went muddy, as if he had lost his grip on the inchoate thought.
It was about studies and lessons, dealing with the rudiments of knowledge, and the schoolboyish tone of it conflicted with the big things that were stirring in him - with the grip upon life that was even then crooking his fingers like eagle's talons, with the cosmic thrills that made him ache, and with the inchoate consciousness of mastery of it all.
Possibly my inchoate thought was: Better to reign among booze-fighters a prince than to toil twelve hours a day at a machine for ten cents an hour.
James Ward wonderingly, until that gentleman broke his train of inchoate thought.
With terrorism, an inchoate crime at best in international law, controversy starts with the usual provisos: Is a "freedom fighter" using violence, even against civilians, a terrorist?
There are only two terrorist threats within this country at present, coming from a tiny faction in Northern Ireland seeking union with the Irish Republic, and an inchoate movement of people, mainly young, who proclaim it their God-sanctioned purpose in life to destroy democracy and establish an Islamic caliphate.
It was Skull and Bones member George Bush who as UN ambassador initiated mundialization, a world citizen movement that was an inchoate form of Agenda 21.
In its tentative, inchoate, anticipatory state, dawn is the world coming to light from the ethereal dark of the night.
Geared toward the study of English law in a Bachelor of Laws (LLB), postgraduate, or conversion course, this work contains 17 chapters discussing criminal law, Actus Reus, Mens Rea, strict liability, participation, inchoate offences, capacity, general defenses, mental capacity defenses, homicide, non-Fatal offences against the person, sexual offences, theft, other offences under the theft acts, Fraud Act 2006, criminal damage, and public order offences.
My inchoate hunches, sloppy analogies, and gaps in logic would somehow be transformed into a coherent and compelling analysis.