inchworm

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Related to inchworms: Geometridae

inch·worm

 (ĭnch′wûrm′)
n.
A caterpillar of a geometrid moth that moves by looping the body in alternate contractions and expansions. Also called looper, measuring worm, spanworm.

inchworm

(ˈɪntʃˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) another name for a measuring worm

meas′ur•ing•worm`

or meas′uring worm`,



n.
a geometrid moth larva that progresses by bringing the rear end of the body forward and then advancing the front end.
Also called inchworm.
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inchworm - small hairless caterpillar having legs on only its front and rear segmentsinchworm - small hairless caterpillar having legs on only its front and rear segments; mostly larvae of moths of the family Geometridae
caterpillar - a wormlike and often brightly colored and hairy or spiny larva of a butterfly or moth
References in periodicals archive ?
One year we had a bad infestation of little inchworms.
Polyurethane-cast pants, crooked like crawling inchworms, crept across the floor, their forms interlaced with chromed aluminum bars shaped after garment patterns.
TTW ask individual students to come measure items with the inchworm and identify how long the item is in terms of inches or inchworms.
Professor Ronen Alon and his research student Ziv Shulman, who led the study, say that their finding contrasts the current opinion about the movement of the immune system "soldiers", according to which they advance like inchworms.
Techniques for crafting flies that resemble bait ranging from ants and termites to beetles and jassids to grasshoppers, bees, inchworms, and more are all covered, as well general advice on tools and materials, and even a some experience-tested fishing tips.
Swimming across microscope fields propelled by their whirling crowns of cilia, creeping along surfaces like inchworms, drawing hoards of microbes into ciliary currents and crushing them in their pulsating jaws, they have fascinated observers for more than 300 years.
There are inchworms, bookworms, flatworms, roundworms and even tongue-worms