incidents


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incidents

Brief clashes or other military disturbances generally of a transitory nature and not involving protracted hostilities.
References in classic literature ?
Eager to find material for stories, and bent on making them original in plot, if not masterly in execution, she searched newspapers for accidents, incidents, and crimes.
While we walked toward the house he related incidents and delivered messages in the tongue he spoke fluently, and I dropped a little behind, curious to know what their relations had become--or remained.
Robert related incidents of his sojourn in Mexico, and Edna talked of events likely to interest him, which had occurred during his absence.
The whole of that wilderness, in which the latter incidents of the legend occurred, is nearly a wilderness still, though the red man has entirely deserted this part of the state.
It is wonderful how many pleasant incidents continually came to pass in that secluded garden-spot when once Phoebe had set herself to look for them.
The wiser effort would have been to diffuse thought and imagination through the opaque substance of to-day, and thus to make it a bright transparency; to spiritualise the burden that began to weigh so heavily; to seek, resolutely, the true and indestructible value that lay hidden in the petty and wearisome incidents, and ordinary characters with which I was now conversant.
In the sperm fishery, this is perhaps one of the most remarkable incidents in all the business of whaling.
So the trader only regarded the mortal anguish which he saw working in those dark features, those clenched hands, and suffocating breathings, as necessary incidents of the trade, and merely calculated whether she was going to scream, and get up a commotion on the boat; for, like other supporters of our peculiar institution, he decidedly disliked agitation.
He merely has some people in his mind, and an incident or two, also a locality, and he trusts he can plunge those people into those incidents with interesting results.
As he lay in the early morning recalling the incidents of his great ad- venture, he noticed that they seemed curiously subdued and far away -- somewhat as if they had happened in another world, or in a time long gone by.
Footnote: Strange as the incidents of this story are, they are not inventions, but facts--even to the public confession of the accused.
This Narrative contains many affecting incidents, many passages of great eloquence and power; but I think the most thrilling one of them all is the de- scription DOUGLASS gives of his feelings, as he stood soliloquizing respecting his fate, and the chances of his one day being a freeman, on the banks of the Chesapeake Bay--viewing the receding vessels as they flew with their white wings before the breeze, and apostrophizing them as animated by the living spirit of freedom.