incitement


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in·cite

 (ĭn-sīt′)
tr.v. in·cit·ed, in·cit·ing, in·cites
To provoke and urge on: troublemakers who incite riots; inciting workers to strike. See Synonyms at provoke.

[Middle English encyten, from Old French enciter, from Latin incitāre, to urge forward : in-, intensive pref.; see in-2 + citāre, to stimulate, frequentative of ciēre, to put in motion; see keiə- in Indo-European roots.]

in·cite′ment n.
in·cit′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incitement - an act of urging on or spurring on or rousing to action or instigating; "the incitement of mutiny"
arousal, rousing - the act of arousing; "the purpose of art is the arousal of emotions"
2.incitement - needed encouragement; "the result was a provocation of vigorous investigation"
encouragement - the expression of approval and support
subornation - underhandedly or improperly inducing someone to do something improper or unlawful
3.incitement - something that incites or provokes; a means of arousing or stirring to action
mental energy, psychic energy - an actuating force or factor
signal - any incitement to action; "he awaited the signal to start"; "the victory was a signal for wild celebration"
4.incitement - the act of exhorting; an earnest attempt at persuasion
persuasion, suasion - the act of persuading (or attempting to persuade); communication intended to induce belief or action
pep talk - a speech of exhortation attempting to instill enthusiasm and determination in a team or staff

incitement

incitement

noun
Something that incites especially a violent response:
Translations
تَحريض
popud
ansporingtilskyndelse
hvatning, eggjun
kışkırt ma

incitement

[ɪnˈsaɪtmənt] Nincitación f, instigación f (to a)

incitement

[ɪnˈsaɪtmənt] nincitation f
incitement to murder → incitation au meurtre

incitement

n
no plAufhetzung f; (of masses also)Aufwieg(e)lung f(to zu)
(= incentive)Anreiz m(to zu), Ansporn m(to zu)

incitement

[ɪnˈsaɪtmənt] nincitamento, istigazione f

incite

(inˈsait) verb
1. to urge (someone) to do something. He incited the people to rebel against the king.
2. to stir up or cause. They incited violence in the crowd.
inˈcitement noun
References in classic literature ?
He was too clever for a bad governess, for a parson's daughter, to spoil; and the strangest if not the brightest thread in the pensive embroidery I just spoke of was the impression I might have got, if I had dared to work it out, that he was under some influence operating in his small intellectual life as a tremendous incitement.
From you, from my home, I shall never again have the smallest incitement to move; and if I do mix in other society, it will be only to shew that my spirit is humbled, my heart amended, and that I can practise the civilities, the lesser duties of life, with gentleness and forbearance.
I fancied that as they consumed, he recalled the pleasure they had already imparted, and the triumph and ever-increasing pleasure he had anticipated from them; and I fancied I guessed the incitement to his secret studies also.
Cass," was Priscilla's parting injunction, as she took the reins, and shook them gently, by way of friendly incitement to Speckle.
I had not yet been a year in this country before I contracted such a love and veneration for the inhabitants, that I entered on a firm resolution never to return to humankind, but to pass the rest of my life among these admirable HOUYHNHNMS, in the contemplation and practice of every virtue, where I could have no example or incitement to vice.
These words redoubled the eagerness of D'Artagnan, who urged his horse, though he stood in need of no incitement, and they proceeded at a rapid pace.
That arousing of the people by their sovereign and his call to them to defend their country- the very incitement which was the chief cause of Russia's triumph in so far as it was produced by the Tsar's personal presence in Moscow- was suggested to the Emperor, and accepted by him, as a pretext for quitting the army.
Momentarily they expected to be pounced upon and torn asunder by some of their captors; and, in fact, it was all that Tarzan and Mugambi and Akut could do to keep the snarling, ill-natured brutes from snapping at the glistening, naked bodies that brushed against them now and then with the movements of the paddlers, whose very fear added incitement to the beasts.
What bit at his consciousness and was a painful incitement in it, was his desire to be with Skipper who was not right, and who was in trouble.
On that and every subsequent occasion his presence served rather as a check upon his host, than an incitement to further acts of intemperance; and he always succeeded in bringing him from the dining-room in good time, and in tolerably good condition; for if Arthur disregarded such intimations as 'Well, I must not detain you from your lady,' or 'We must not forget that Mrs.
At the very moment when Vronsky thought that now was the time to overtake Mahotin, Frou-Frou herself, understanding his thoughts, without any incitement on his part, gained ground considerably, and began getting alongside of Mahotin on the most favorable side, close to the inner cord.
I know not by what chain of thought the idea presented itself, but it instantly darted into my mind that the murderer had come to mock at my misery and taunt me with the death of Clerval, as a new incitement for me to comply with his hellish desires.