incite

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in·cite

 (ĭn-sīt′)
tr.v. in·cit·ed, in·cit·ing, in·cites
To provoke and urge on: troublemakers who incite riots; inciting workers to strike. See Synonyms at provoke.

[Middle English encyten, from Old French enciter, from Latin incitāre, to urge forward : in-, intensive pref.; see in-2 + citāre, to stimulate, frequentative of ciēre, to put in motion; see keiə- in Indo-European roots.]

in·cite′ment n.
in·cit′er n.

incite

(ɪnˈsaɪt)
vb
(tr) to stir up or provoke to action
[C15: from Latin incitāre, from in-2 + citāre to excite]
ˌinciˈtation n
inˈcitement n
inˈciter n
inˈcitingly adv

in•cite

(ɪnˈsaɪt)

v.t. -cit•ed, -cit•ing.
to stimulate to action; urge on; stir up.
[1475–85; < Latin incitāre=in- in-2 + citāre to start up, excite]
in•cit′a•ble, adj.
in•cit′ant, adj., n.
in`ci•ta′tion (-saɪˈteɪ ʃən, -sɪ-) n.
in•cit′er, n.
in•cit′ing•ly, adv.
syn: incite, rouse, provoke mean to goad or inspire an individual or group to take some action or express some feeling. incite means to induce activity of any kind, although it often refers to violent or uncontrolled behavior: incited to greater effort; incited to rebellion. rouse is used in a similar way, but has an underlying sense of awakening from sleep or inactivity: to rouse an apathetic team. provoke means to stir to sudden, strong feeling or vigorous action: Kicking the animal provoked it to attack.

incite


Past participle: incited
Gerund: inciting

Imperative
incite
incite
Present
I incite
you incite
he/she/it incites
we incite
you incite
they incite
Preterite
I incited
you incited
he/she/it incited
we incited
you incited
they incited
Present Continuous
I am inciting
you are inciting
he/she/it is inciting
we are inciting
you are inciting
they are inciting
Present Perfect
I have incited
you have incited
he/she/it has incited
we have incited
you have incited
they have incited
Past Continuous
I was inciting
you were inciting
he/she/it was inciting
we were inciting
you were inciting
they were inciting
Past Perfect
I had incited
you had incited
he/she/it had incited
we had incited
you had incited
they had incited
Future
I will incite
you will incite
he/she/it will incite
we will incite
you will incite
they will incite
Future Perfect
I will have incited
you will have incited
he/she/it will have incited
we will have incited
you will have incited
they will have incited
Future Continuous
I will be inciting
you will be inciting
he/she/it will be inciting
we will be inciting
you will be inciting
they will be inciting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been inciting
you have been inciting
he/she/it has been inciting
we have been inciting
you have been inciting
they have been inciting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been inciting
you will have been inciting
he/she/it will have been inciting
we will have been inciting
you will have been inciting
they will have been inciting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been inciting
you had been inciting
he/she/it had been inciting
we had been inciting
you had been inciting
they had been inciting
Conditional
I would incite
you would incite
he/she/it would incite
we would incite
you would incite
they would incite
Past Conditional
I would have incited
you would have incited
he/she/it would have incited
we would have incited
you would have incited
they would have incited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.incite - give an incentive for actionincite - give an incentive for action; "This moved me to sacrifice my career"
cause, do, make - give rise to; cause to happen or occur, not always intentionally; "cause a commotion"; "make a stir"; "cause an accident"
impress, strike, affect, move - have an emotional or cognitive impact upon; "This child impressed me as unusually mature"; "This behavior struck me as odd"
move - arouse sympathy or compassion in; "Her fate moved us all"
2.incite - provoke or stir up; "incite a riot"; "set off great unrest among the people"
provoke, stimulate - provide the needed stimulus for
raise - activate or stir up; "raise a mutiny"
3.incite - urge on; cause to act; "The other children egged the boy on, but he did not want to throw the stone through the window"
goose - prod into action
halloo - urge on with shouts; "halloo the dogs in a hunt"
goad - urge with or as if with a goad

incite

verb provoke, encourage, drive, excite, prompt, urge, spur, stimulate, set on, animate, rouse, prod, stir up, inflame, instigate, whip up, egg on, goad, impel, foment, put up to, agitate for or against He incited his fellow citizens to take revenge.
discourage, deter, dissuade, restrain, dampen, dishearten

incite

verb
Translations
يَحًث، يُثيريُشَجِّع على، يُحَرِّض
podněcovatvyvolat
ophidseopildneprovokeretilskynde
hvetja, ÿta undir, egnakynda undir, egna til
kurstymasskatinimas
izraisītkūdītmusinātpamudināt
kışkırtmakışkırtmak

incite

[ɪnˈsaɪt] VT [+ violence, riots, hatred] → incitar, instigar
to incite sb to do sthincitar or instigar a algn a hacer algo
to incite sb to violenceincitar or instigar a algn a la violencia

incite

[ɪnˈsaɪt] vt [+ hatred] → inciter à, pousser à
to incite sb to do sth → inciter qn à faire qch, pousser qn à faire qch
to incite sb against sb → monter qn contre qn

incite

vtaufhetzen; masses alsoaufwiegeln; racial hatred, violence, riotaufhetzen zu; to incite the masses/somebody to violencedie Massen/jdn zu Gewalttätigkeiten aufhetzen

incite

[ɪnˈsaɪt] vt to incite sb (to sth/to do sth)incitare qn (a qc/a fare qc), istigare qn (a qc/a fare qc)

incite

(inˈsait) verb
1. to urge (someone) to do something. He incited the people to rebel against the king.
2. to stir up or cause. They incited violence in the crowd.
inˈcitement noun
References in classic literature ?
Could that which procures a freer vent for the products of the earth, which furnishes new incitements to the cultivation of land, which is the most powerful instrument in increasing the quantity of money in a state -- could that, in fine, which is the faithful handmaid of labor and industry, in every shape, fail to augment that article, which is the prolific parent of far the greatest part of the objects upon which they are exerted?
To be losing such pleasures was no trifle; to be losing them, because she was in the midst of closeness and noise, to have confinement, bad air, bad smells, substituted for liberty, freshness, fragrance, and verdure, was infinitely worse: but even these incitements to regret were feeble, compared with what arose from the conviction of being missed by her best friends, and the longing to be useful to those who were wanting her!
It by no means follows, however, that the incitements of Passion' or the precepts of Duty, or even the lessons of Truth, may not be introduced into a poem, and with advantage; for they may subserve incidentally, in various ways, the general purposes of the work: but the true artist will always contrive to tone them down in proper subjection to that Beauty which is the atmosphere and the real essence of the poem.
Therefore, gentlemen, the word ELECTION, to my thinking, is in a fair way to cause as much mischief as the words CONSCIENCE and LIBERTY, which ill-defined and ill-understood, were flung broadcast among the people, to serve as watchwords of revolt and incitements to destruction.
He was too clever for a bad governess, for a parson's daughter, to spoil; and the strangest if not the brightest thread in the pensive embroidery I just spoke of was the impression I might have got, if I had dared to work it out, that he was under some influence operating in his small intellectual life as a tremendous incitement.
From you, from my home, I shall never again have the smallest incitement to move; and if I do mix in other society, it will be only to shew that my spirit is humbled, my heart amended, and that I can practise the civilities, the lesser duties of life, with gentleness and forbearance.
I fancied that as they consumed, he recalled the pleasure they had already imparted, and the triumph and ever-increasing pleasure he had anticipated from them; and I fancied I guessed the incitement to his secret studies also.
Cass," was Priscilla's parting injunction, as she took the reins, and shook them gently, by way of friendly incitement to Speckle.
I had not yet been a year in this country before I contracted such a love and veneration for the inhabitants, that I entered on a firm resolution never to return to humankind, but to pass the rest of my life among these admirable HOUYHNHNMS, in the contemplation and practice of every virtue, where I could have no example or incitement to vice.
These words redoubled the eagerness of D'Artagnan, who urged his horse, though he stood in need of no incitement, and they proceeded at a rapid pace.
That arousing of the people by their sovereign and his call to them to defend their country- the very incitement which was the chief cause of Russia's triumph in so far as it was produced by the Tsar's personal presence in Moscow- was suggested to the Emperor, and accepted by him, as a pretext for quitting the army.
Momentarily they expected to be pounced upon and torn asunder by some of their captors; and, in fact, it was all that Tarzan and Mugambi and Akut could do to keep the snarling, ill-natured brutes from snapping at the glistening, naked bodies that brushed against them now and then with the movements of the paddlers, whose very fear added incitement to the beasts.