inclement

(redirected from inclemencies)
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in·clem·ent

 (ĭn-klĕm′ənt)
adj.
1. Stormy: inclement weather.
2. Showing no clemency; unmerciful.

in·clem′en·cy n.
in·clem′ent·ly adv.

inclement

(ɪnˈklɛmənt)
adj
1. (of weather) stormy, severe, or tempestuous
2. harsh, severe, or merciless
inˈclemency, inˈclementness n
inˈclemently adv

in•clem•ent

(ɪnˈklɛm ənt)

adj.
1. severe; stormy: inclement weather.
2. not kind or merciful.
[1615–25; < Latin inclēment-, s. of inclemēns;]
in•clem′en•cy, in•clem′ent•ness, n.
in•clem′ent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inclement - (of weather or climate) severe
intemperate - (of weather or climate) not mild; subject to extremes; "an intemperate climate"; "intemperate zones"
clement - (of weather or climate) physically mild; "clement weather"
2.inclement - used of persons or behavior; showing no clemency or mercy; "the harsh sentence of an inclement judge"
merciless, unmerciful - having or showing no mercy; "the merciless enemy"; "a merciless critic"; "gave him a merciless beating"
clement - (used of persons or behavior) inclined to show mercy; "a more clement judge reduced the sentence"

inclement

adjective (Formal) stormy, severe, rough, foul, harsh, rigorous, boisterous, tempestuous, intemperate, bitter Thousands braved the inclement weather last week.
stormy fine, calm, pleasant, mild, clement, temperate, balmy
Translations
armotonmyrskyisäraivoisa
inclemens

inclement

[ɪnˈklemənt] ADJ [weather] → inclemente

inclement

[ɪnˈklɛmənt] adj [weather] → rude

inclement

adj weatherrau, unfreundlich

inclement

[ɪnˈklɛmənt] adjinclemente
References in classic literature ?
This writer went through all the usual topics of European moralists, showing "how diminutive, contemptible, and helpless an animal was man in his own nature; how unable to defend himself from inclemencies of the air, or the fury of wild beasts: how much he was excelled by one creature in strength, by another in speed, by a third in foresight, by a fourth in industry.
That is," said Don Quixote, "when they cannot help it, or when they are in love; and so true is this that there have been knights who have remained two years on rocks, in sunshine and shade and all the inclemencies of heaven, without their ladies knowing anything of it; and one of these was Amadis, when, under the name of Beltenebros, he took up his abode on the Pena Pobre for -I know not if it was eight years or eight months, for I am not very sure of the reckoning; at any rate he stayed there doing penance for I know not what pique the Princess Oriana had against him; but no more of this now, Sancho, and make haste before a mishap like Rocinante's befalls the ass.
The latter, generally French creoles, live comfortably in cabins and log-huts, well sheltered from the inclemencies of the seasons.