inclusive terms

Translations

inclusive terms

npl (Brit) → (prezzo m) tutto compreso inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, if we start with the use of the term 'people' rather than 'tribe', it becomes possible to think in more inclusive terms because we are, in the end, all people.
PUSHING the limits of national discourse, Gujarat chief minister Narendra Modi on Sunday unveiled his neo- secular agenda, redefining secularism in decidedly inclusive terms and saying that for him the term means " India First.
But there is a distinct difference in busyness and productivity; these are not mutually inclusive terms.
He notes that Pope John Paul II, in his 1994 apostolic letter Ordinatio Sacerdotal-is ("On Reserving Priestly Ordination to Men Alone"), "never referred explicitly to the diaconate, nor used more inclusive terms such as clergy.
The broad and inclusive terms covers the said terms as well as concept of
Use inclusive terms like 'staff and 'workers' and 'staff the office'.
It is not until the final few pages that the authors seem to acknowledge some of the limitations of their approach, and they then begin to talk in much more inclusive terms of the need for a politics beyond class division.
In fact, the writer did not use any inclusive terms to suggest that he or she was one of the "Moslem warriors.
The document defines the "essential elements" of "representative democracy" that is to say, the "democratic order" in very specific and inclusive terms, including:
McNabb said Toyne did not like a portion of the guidelines that suggested using universal, inclusive terms for deity rather than particular proper names.
Most of the church realizes that we have to find more inclusive terms for people, as is evident, for example, in the U.
Similarly, we use chair instead of chairman, companion instead of wife (or husband), and mature instead of elderly (or old) because the words we seek to replace are laden with bias or prejudice or assumptions that we hope to avoid by embracing other, more inclusive terms.