inconcinnity

in·con·cin·ni·ty

 (ĭn′kən-sĭn′ĭ-tē)
n.
Lack of congruity or harmony; unsuitability.

inconcinnity

(ˌɪnkənˈsɪnɪtɪ)
n
a lack of concinnity; incongruity; lack of harmony or elegance
References in periodicals archive ?
Jupiter's exclamation, naming the projected murder a "test," further betrays this inconcinnity.
Here Jerome's resort to flamboyant phrasing would accordingly appear to entail a certain infelicity: this kind of inconcinnity is characteristic of such Hieronymian borrowings from elsewhere (44).
Perhaps Shakespeare experienced a tension between his artistic ideal as a high-minded professional playwright aware of a critical, intelligent readership and the more immediate pressure, despite an occasional dramaturgical inconcinnity, to secure profits from live performance.
The literary quality of the essays turns them into little gems, whereas Schallenberger's interviews sometimes suffer from the repetitiveness, inconcinnity, and imprecision that characterize mundane speech.
17) The inconcinnity of playing simultaneously a lament and a victory song (or shout) and the absurdity of imitating grieving Gorgons in order to celebrate a hero's victory may be lost on some of his interpreters, but were not lost on Pindar.
Consider the slight inconcinnity between the book's cover (a detail of William Blake's David Delivered) and the Preface's promise: 'The purpose of this introductory study is restoration; the text is to appear, I hope, with some of the freshness it once had.
The relative clauses are treated differently, but this serves as an agreeable inconcinnity in the overall parallel structure.
The thesis that Lucretius means his words to imitate the course of nature would explain one trait of style that is otherwise nothing but a recurring inconcinnity.
134 `The inconcinnity spoils what the poet intended as a devastating line and raises a doubt about the accuracy of the manuscript tradition.
If, in evasion of this second objection, it should be claimed (as some have claimed) that 1575-6 (which, if sound, are too inept to be Euripidean; if Euripidean, must be emended) mean that they are dead or dying, the inconcinnity is not eliminated, its location is merely shifted: for the sons cannot be described, within the same sentence, as "fighting" (1574), and a moment later, in an appositional phrase, as "now dead (or dying)" (1575-6).
Such alternative versions of the epics are often hypothesized by modern readers puzzled by an apparently awkward turn of the plot, an inconsistency in detail, or some other inconcinnity that is the natural result of the conflation, so common in truly oral traditions, of disparate tales.