incongruousness


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in·con·gru·ous

 (ĭn-kŏng′gro͞o-əs)
adj.
1. Lacking in harmony; incompatible: a joke that was incongruous with polite conversation.
2. Not in agreement, as with principles; inconsistent: a plan incongruous with reason.
3. Not in keeping with what is correct, proper, or logical; inappropriate: incongruous behavior.

[From Latin incongruus : in-, not; see in-1 + congruus, congruous; see congruous.]

in·con′gru·ous·ly adv.
in·con′gru·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incongruousness - the quality of disagreeing; being unsuitable and inappropriate
incompatibility - the quality of being unable to exist or work in congenial combination
irony - incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs; "the irony of Ireland's copying the nation she most hated"
congruence, congruity, congruousness - the quality of agreeing; being suitable and appropriate
Translations
عَدَم مُناسَبَه
ósamkvæmni; òaî aî stinga í stúf
nezhoda

incongruous

(iŋˈkoŋgruəs) adjective
unsuitable or out of place; odd. Boots would look incongruous with an evening dress.
inconˈgruity, inˈcongruousness noun
References in periodicals archive ?
The crime for which Turnus is eventually killed, taking a ring from the corpse of the slain Trojan ally Pallas, requires the narrator to comment on its incongruousness with Turnus's character: "als im vbile gezam, / so tugentreiche so er was" [As virtuous as he was, this deed suited him badly] (12575-76).
It is insufficient inasmuch as its hubris ignores incongruousness at different scales, such that the relationship between individuals and the whole can be so fuzzy as to be useless.
In turn, it reflected what was in effect the profoundly felt incongruousness of the reduction of the category of royal family member to a matter of party-political affiliation.
His earlier attempt to fight Scylla in all his warrior's regalia, which Circe had already flatly discouraged, and which had highlighted the incongruousness of his warrior impulse against an unconquerable monster, seems, if anything, even more improbable now, against an enemy that is not even there, whose body, to the extent that one may be posited, is part and parcel of the landscape itself, part of natural processes that obey a cycle outside of human reach.