inconsistency

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in·con·sis·ten·cy

 (ĭn′kən-sĭs′tən-sē)
n. pl. in·con·sis·ten·cies
1. The state or quality of being inconsistent.
2. Something inconsistent: many inconsistencies in your proposal.

inconsistency

(ˌɪnkənˈsɪstənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. lack of consistency or agreement; incompatibility
2. an inconsistent feature or quality
3. (Logic) logic
a. the property of being inconsistent
b. a self-contradictory proposition

in•con•sist•en•cy

(ˌɪn kənˈsɪs tən si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the quality or condition of being inconsistent.
2. something that is inconsistent: a report full of inconsistencies.
Often, in`con•sist′ence.
[1640–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inconsistency - the relation between propositions that cannot both be true at the same time
contradictoriness - the relation that exists when opposites cannot coexist
2.inconsistency - the quality of being inconsistent and lacking a harmonious uniformity among things or parts
nonuniformity - the quality of being diverse and interesting
consistence, consistency - a harmonious uniformity or agreement among things or parts

inconsistency

noun
1. unreliability, instability, unpredictability, fickleness, unsteadiness His worst fault was his inconsistency.

inconsistency

noun
A marked lack of correspondence or agreement:
Translations
nedůslednostneslučitelnost
inkonsekvensuforenelighed
következetlenség
ósamkvæmni
tutarsızlık

inconsistency

[ˌɪnkənˈsɪstənsɪ] N
1. (= inconsistent nature) [of behaviour] → carácter m contradictorio or incongruente; [of statement, account, evidence, policy] → falta f de coherencia
his worst fault is his inconsistencysu peor defecto es que es un inconsecuente
2. (= contradiction) → contradicción f

inconsistency

[ˌɪnkənˈsɪstənsi] n
[person] → inconséquence f
[work] → irrégularité f
[discipline, regulations] → manque m de constance
(= conflict) → contradiction f
inconsistency between
the inconsistency between his political and his religious beliefs → la contradiction entre ses croyances politiques et religieuses
(in statement, evidence)contradiction f
the inconsistencies in his evidence → les contradictions dans son témoignage

inconsistency

n
(= contradictoriness)Widersprüchlichkeit f, → Ungereimtheit f; the inconsistencies in his evidencedie Widersprüche in seiner Aussage
(= unevenness: of work, in quality etc)Unbeständigkeit f

inconsistency

[ˌɪnkənˈsɪstnsɪ] n
a. (of actions) → contraddizione f, incoerenza; (of work) → irregolarità
b. (of statement) → incongruenza

inconsistent

(inkənˈsistənt) adjective
1. (often with with) contradictory in some way; not in agreement. What you're saying today is quite inconsistent with the statement you made yesterday.
2. changeable, eg in standard. His work is inconsistent.
ˌinconˈsistency noun
(plural inconˈsistencies).

inconsistency

n. inconsistencia.
References in classic literature ?
It is necessary to keep these inconsistencies of John's character in view, that the reader may understand his conduct during the present evening.
Madame Granson and the Chevalier de Valois, although they could not explain to themselves Mademoiselle Cormon's inconsistencies, had detected her naive glances in that direction, the meaning of which seemed clear enough to make them both resolve to ruin the hopes of the already rejected purveyor, --hopes which it was evident he still indulged.
Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies, DO divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.
I wonder the very paving-stones opposite our house can have the patience to stay there and be a witness of such inconsistencies and contradictions as all that sounding nonsense, and Ma's management
If there be inconsistencies and errors, let the blame fall not upon John Carter, but rather upon my faulty memory, where it belongs.
Beneath these superficial inconsistencies, the great heart, the essentially true and generous nature of the woman, only waited the sufficient occasion to assert themselves.
We should consider whether he makes them (1) merely caricatures, or (2) type characters, standing for certain general traits of human nature but not convincingly real or especially significant persons, or (3) genuine individuals with all the inconsistencies and half-revealed tendencies that in actual life belong to real personality.
On more mature reflection, I have discovered the reasons of these glaring inconsistencies.
If I seem to boast more than is becoming, my excuse is that I brag for humanity rather than for myself; and my shortcomings and inconsistencies do not affect the truth of my statement.
She wanted to be done with it--maybe simply from the fatigue of continuous effort in good or evil, which, in the bulk of common mortals, accounts for so many surprising inconsistencies of conduct.
In the beginnings of literature and philosophy, amid the first efforts of thought and language, more inconsistencies occur than now, when the paths of speculation are well worn and the meaning of words precisely defined.
She hated war and liked soldiers--it was one of her amiable inconsistencies.