incredulous


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Related to incredulous: audacity, thesaurus

in·cred·u·lous

 (ĭn-krĕj′ə-ləs)
adj.
1. Skeptical; disbelieving: incredulous of stories about flying saucers.
2. Expressive of disbelief: an incredulous stare.

[From Latin incrēdulus : in-, not; see in-1 + crēdulus, believing; see credulous.]

in·cred′u·lous·ly adv.
in·cred′u·lous·ness n.

incredulous

(ɪnˈkrɛdjʊləs)
adj
(often foll by of) not prepared or willing to believe (something); unbelieving
inˈcredulously adv
inˈcredulousness n

in•cred•u•lous

(ɪnˈkrɛdʒ ə ləs)

adj.
1. disinclined or indisposed to believe; skeptical.
2. indicating disbelief.
in•cred′u•lous•ly, adv.
in•cred′u•lous•ness, n.
syn: See doubtful.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.incredulous - not disposed or willing to believe; unbelieving
incredible, unbelievable - beyond belief or understanding; "at incredible speed"; "the book's plot is simply incredible"
distrustful - having or showing distrust; "a man of distrustful nature"; "my experience...in other fields of law has made me distrustful of rules of thumb generally"- B.N.Cardozo; "vigilant and distrustful superintendence"- Thomas Jefferson
credulous - disposed to believe on little evidence; "the gimmick would convince none but the most credulous"

incredulous

incredulous

adjective
Refusing or reluctant to believe:
Translations
قَليل التَّصْديق، شاكٌّ، مُتَشَكِّك
nevěřícný
skeptiskvantro
epäileväepäuskoinenskeptinen
tortrygginn
netikintis
neticīgsskeptisks
inanmazkuşkucu

incredulous

[ɪnˈkredjʊləs] ADJ [expression] → de incredulidad
I was incredulousno lo creí

incredulous

[ɪnˈkrɛdjʊləs] adj [person, voice] → incrédule; [silence] → incrédule

incredulous

adjungläubig, skeptisch; look alsozweifelnd; his voice was incredulousseine Stimme klang ungläubig

incredulous

[ɪnˈkrɛdjʊləs] adjincredulo/a

incredulous

(inˈkredjuləs) , ((American) -dʒu-) adjective
unwilling to believe. She listened to him with an incredulous expression.
ˌincreˈdulity (-ˈdjuː-) noun
References in classic literature ?
When he ventured to utter this impression to his companions, it was met by Hawkeye with an incredulous shake of the head.
Affected by the solemnity of the scene, there was a wondering gaze of incredulous curiosity in his countenance.
As such a man, however, was not of much practical use in the ship, especially as he refused to work except when he pleased, the incredulous captain would fain have been rid of him; but apprised that that individual's intention was to land him in the first convenient port, the archangel forthwith opened all his seals and vials -- devoting the ship and all hands to unconditional perdition, in case this intention was carried out.
And then, while some of the other prisoners gathered round he told his wild story; most of them were incredulous, but Duane knew that Jurgis could never have made up such a yarn as that.
the ear that has never heard anything but abuse is strangely incredulous of anything so heavenly as kindness; and Topsy only thought Eva's speech something funny and inexplicable,--she did not believe it.
Mind you don't," said Bessie; and when she had ascertained that I was really subsiding, she loosened her hold of me; then she and Miss Abbot stood with folded arms, looking darkly and doubtfully on my face, as incredulous of my sanity.
She looked at him with an incredulous surprise, which would have been irresistibly absurd under less serious circumstances.
Though he looked the phantom through and through, and saw it standing before him; though he felt the chilling influence of its death-cold eyes; and marked the very texture of the folded kerchief bound about its head and chin, which wrapper he had not observed before; he was still incredulous, and fought against his senses.
I go home, more incredulous than ever, to a lodging that I have hard by; and get up very early in the morning, to ride to the Highgate road and fetch my aunt.
But ever afterwards, I remembered - and soon afterwards with stronger reason - that while Estella looked at me merely with incredulous wonder, the spectral figure of Miss Havisham, her hand still covering her heart, seemed all resolved into a ghastly stare of pity and remorse.
I am very sure you shan't," said Agatha, after an incredulous pause, springing up and gathering her skirt as if to run away.
Now the case was in the hands of an examining-magistrate called Faure, an incredulous, commonplace, superficial sort of person, (I write as I think), with a mind utterly unprepared to receive a confidence of this kind.