incrementalist

in·cre·men·tal·ism

 (ĭn′krə-mĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
Social or political gradualism.

in′cre·men′tal·ist adj. & n.

incrementalist

(ˌɪnkrɪˈmɛntəlɪst) political theory
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who or an organization which holds to or implements incrementalism
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or pertaining to the theory of incrementalism
References in periodicals archive ?
The woefully inadequate incrementalist approach that social
As an incrementalist, he sees progress where others would see stagnation.
In a similar way, Charles Lindblom (1959) considered that a knowledge of precedents (however imperfect) could actually remedy the incrementalist approach to decision-making and the "muddling through" of public policy that seemed to militate against meaningful changes to practices.
The book is well organized to accomplish Friedland's incrementalist narrative of a progressively developing discipline.
Proposition Two: Disagreement over the present course of action can be minimized if the disagreement falls within the incrementalist sphere and is a matter of policy velocity and not fundamental policy direction.
In other words, the Coalition has engaged in similar incrementalist reforms that attempt to constrain Medicare to a residual provider alongside a large and profitable private industry.
In any given case there are usually multiple possible incrementalist outcomes available to the court.
Another important characteristic of this book is that it also recommends an incrementalist approach to health care policy reform implementation.
An incrementalist leader, who must face the constraints of a problem, is open to information (thus being strategic) and, in terms of motivation, is centered on manageability.
As will be discussed, section 751(b) is the exception to this incrementalist approach.
Instead of insisting that full sanctions will remain in place until the dictatorship has ended and free elections have been held in Cuba, Bush should take an incrementalist approach that gradually builds the foundation necessary for long-lasting reform.
It challenges the incrementalist, exclusively electoralist strategy that guides his party today: namely, to accept 95 percent of neo-liberalism (including most of what Stephen Harper is now putting on the table, courtesy of Jack Layton's 2006 electoral manoeuvres), and then pretend that electing a few more NDPers to Parliament will somehow make it all more tolerable.