incriminate


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in·crim·i·nate

 (ĭn-krĭm′ə-nāt′)
tr.v. in·crim·i·nat·ed, in·crim·i·nat·ing, in·crim·i·nates
1. To accuse of a crime or other wrongful act.
2. To cause to appear guilty of a crime or fault; implicate: testimony that incriminated the defendant.

[Late Latin incrīmināre, incrīmināt- : Latin in-, causative pref.; see in-2 + Latin crīmen, crīmin-, crime; see crime.]

in·crim′i·na′tion n.
in·crim′i·na·to′ry (-nə-tôr′ē) adj.

incriminate

(ɪnˈkrɪmɪˌneɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) to imply or suggest the guilt or error of (someone)
2. (Law) to charge with a crime or fault
[C18: from Late Latin incrīmināre to accuse, from Latin crīmen accusation; see crime]
inˌcrimiˈnation n
inˈcrimiˌnator n
inˈcriminatory adj

in•crim•i•nate

(ɪnˈkrɪm əˌneɪt)

v.t. -nat•ed, -nat•ing.
to accuse of or indicate involvement in a crime or fault: The testimony of the defendant incriminated many others.
[1720–30; < Late Latin incrīminātus, past participle of incrīmināre to accuse. See in-2, criminate]
in•crim`i•na′tion, n.
in•crim′i•na`tor, n.
in•crim•i•na•to•ry (-nəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.

incriminate


Past participle: incriminated
Gerund: incriminating

Imperative
incriminate
incriminate
Present
I incriminate
you incriminate
he/she/it incriminates
we incriminate
you incriminate
they incriminate
Preterite
I incriminated
you incriminated
he/she/it incriminated
we incriminated
you incriminated
they incriminated
Present Continuous
I am incriminating
you are incriminating
he/she/it is incriminating
we are incriminating
you are incriminating
they are incriminating
Present Perfect
I have incriminated
you have incriminated
he/she/it has incriminated
we have incriminated
you have incriminated
they have incriminated
Past Continuous
I was incriminating
you were incriminating
he/she/it was incriminating
we were incriminating
you were incriminating
they were incriminating
Past Perfect
I had incriminated
you had incriminated
he/she/it had incriminated
we had incriminated
you had incriminated
they had incriminated
Future
I will incriminate
you will incriminate
he/she/it will incriminate
we will incriminate
you will incriminate
they will incriminate
Future Perfect
I will have incriminated
you will have incriminated
he/she/it will have incriminated
we will have incriminated
you will have incriminated
they will have incriminated
Future Continuous
I will be incriminating
you will be incriminating
he/she/it will be incriminating
we will be incriminating
you will be incriminating
they will be incriminating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been incriminating
you have been incriminating
he/she/it has been incriminating
we have been incriminating
you have been incriminating
they have been incriminating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been incriminating
you will have been incriminating
he/she/it will have been incriminating
we will have been incriminating
you will have been incriminating
they will have been incriminating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been incriminating
you had been incriminating
he/she/it had been incriminating
we had been incriminating
you had been incriminating
they had been incriminating
Conditional
I would incriminate
you would incriminate
he/she/it would incriminate
we would incriminate
you would incriminate
they would incriminate
Past Conditional
I would have incriminated
you would have incriminated
he/she/it would have incriminated
we would have incriminated
you would have incriminated
they would have incriminated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.incriminate - suggest that someone is guilty
paint a picture, suggest, evoke - call to mind; "this remark evoked sadness"
2.incriminate - bring an accusation against; level a charge against; "The neighbors accused the man of spousal abuse"
reproach, upbraid - express criticism towards; "The president reproached the general for his irresponsible behavior"
accuse, charge - blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against; "he charged the director with indifference"
arraign - accuse of a wrong or an inadequacy
recriminate - return an accusation against someone or engage in mutual accusations; charge in return
lodge, file, charge - file a formal charge against; "The suspect was charged with murdering his wife"

incriminate

verb implicate, involve, accuse, blame, indict, point the finger at (informal), stigmatize, arraign, blacken the name of, inculpate He claimed that the drugs had been planted to incriminate him.

incriminate

verb
1. To make an accusation against:
2. To cause to appear involved in or guilty of a crime or fault:
Translations
يُجَرِّم، يَتَّهِم بِجُرْم
obvinit
anklage
syyttää
gyanúba kever
bendla viî glæp
inkriminavimasinkriminuojantisinkriminuoti
inkriminēt, apvainot
suçla mak

incriminate

[ɪnˈkrɪmɪneɪt] VTincriminar

incriminate

[ɪnˈkrɪmɪneɪt] vtincriminer, compromettre
to incriminate o.s. → se compromettre

incriminate

vtbelasten; he is afraid of incriminating himselfer hat Angst, dass er sich belasten könnte

incriminate

[ɪnˈkrɪmɪˌneɪt] vtincriminare

incriminate

(inˈkrimineit) verb
(of evidence) to show the involvement of (someone) in a crime etc.
inˈcriminating adjective
inˌcrimiˈnation noun
References in classic literature ?
If the worst came to the worst, and the boy came to harm, the paper would incriminate nobody.
One mistake had been made in not arresting Boone instantly, as he was allowed some few minutes during which he might have communicated with his friend the Lascar, but this fault was soon remedied, and he was seized and searched, without anything being found which could incriminate him.
Even if I rescued Raffles for the time being, the police would promptly ascertain that it was I who had been rung up by the burglar, and the fact of my not having said a word about it would be directly damning to me, if in the end it did not incriminate us both.
So cleverly was the colonel concealed that, even when the Moriarty gang was broken up, we could not incriminate him.
The merest whisper would be sufficient to incriminate me for ever.
Ah, sir," said Rosa, addressing the person whom she thought to be her real judge, "I am going to incriminate myself very seriously.
Every paper which would incriminate him was destroyed before he left the house.
Now police have taken away Bieb's mobile phone, leaving him fearful it could incriminate him further *tearfaced emoji*.
Now, police have taken away the Biebster's mobile phone, leaving him fearful it could incriminate him further.
Summary: The fate of a housemaid who killed a four-month-old baby in a bid to incriminate her workmate is to be decided next week.
I understood that under criminal law, I did not have to incriminate myself and tell the police that I was the driver.
THE British Government announced plans in 1988 to change the law regarding a suspect's right to remain silent so that remaining silent could incriminate rather than protect a suspect.