incubation

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Related to incubations: Incubatory

in·cu·ba·tion

 (ĭn′kyə-bā′shən, ĭng′-)
n.
1.
a. The act of incubating.
b. The state of being incubated.
2. Medicine The development of an infection from the time the pathogen enters the body until signs or symptoms first appear.
3. Medicine The maintenance of an infant, especially a premature infant, in an environment of controlled temperature, humidity, and oxygen concentration in order to provide optimal conditions for growth and development.

in′cu·ba′tion·al adj.

in•cu•ba•tion

(ˌɪn kyəˈbeɪ ʃən, ˌɪŋ-)

n.
1. the act or process of incubating.
2. the state of being incubated.
3. the period between the initial infection and the appearance of symptoms of a disease.
[1605–15; < Latin]
incubate, incubation - Latin incubare, the source of incubate, literally meant "lie down on"; incubation once had the sense of sleeping in a sacred place or temple for oracular purposes.
See also related terms for sleeping.

incubation

1. The inducement of dreams.
2. Keeping eggs or embryos warm (e.g. by sitting on them) in preparation for hatching.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incubation - maintaining something at the most favorable temperature for its developmentincubation - maintaining something at the most favorable temperature for its development
care, tending, attention, aid - the work of providing treatment for or attending to someone or something; "no medical care was required"; "the old car needs constant attention"
2.incubation - (pathology) the phase in the development of an infection between the time a pathogen enters the body and the time the first symptoms appear
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
infection - the pathological state resulting from the invasion of the body by pathogenic microorganisms
phase, stage - any distinct time period in a sequence of events; "we are in a transitional stage in which many former ideas must be revised or rejected"
3.incubation - sitting on eggs so as to hatch them by the warmth of the bodyincubation - sitting on eggs so as to hatch them by the warmth of the body
birthing, giving birth, parturition, birth - the process of giving birth
Translations
حِضانَه، إحْتِضان
inkubace
inkubationinkubationstid
kiköltésköltéslappangás
klak; meîgöngutími sóttar
inkubácia
kuluçkaya yatma

incubation

[ˌɪnkjʊˈbeɪʃən]
A. N [of egg, disease] → incubación f
B. CPD incubation period Nperíodo m de incubación

incubation

[ˌɪnkjʊˈbeɪʃən] n
[egg] → incubation f
[disease, germ, virus] → incubation fincubation period npériode f d'incubation

incubation

n (of egg, fig: of plan) → Ausbrüten nt; (of bacteria)Züchten nt

incubation

[ˌɪnkjʊˈbeɪʃn] nincubazione f

incubate

(ˈiŋkjubeit) verb
1. to produce (young birds) from eggs by sitting on them or by keeping them warm by some other means.
2. (of germs or disease) to develop until signs of the disease appear. How long does chickenpox take to incubate?
ˌincuˈbation noun
ˈincubator noun
a heated box-like apparatus for hatching eggs or a similar one for rearing premature babies etc.

in·cu·ba·tion

n. incubación.
1. período de latencia de una enfermedad antes de manifestarse;
2. mantenimiento de un ambiente especial ajustado a las necesidades de recién nacidos, esp. prematuros;
___ periodperíodo de ___.
References in classic literature ?
Coming from eggs in which they have lain for five years, the period of incubation, they step forth into the world perfectly developed except in size.
Each adult Martian female brings forth about thirteen eggs each year, and those which meet the size, weight, and specific gravity tests are hidden in the recesses of some subterranean vault where the temperature is too low for incubation.
Will saw clearly enough the pitiable instances of long incubation producing no chick, and but for gratitude would have laughed at Casaubon, whose plodding application, rows of note-books, and small taper of learned theory exploring the tossed ruins of the world, seemed to enforce a moral entirely encouraging to Will's generous reliance on the intentions of the universe with regard to himself.
I am strongly inclined to believe that this view is correct, from having been independently led (as we shall hereafter see) to an analogous conclusion with regard to the South American ostrich, the females of which are parasitical, if I may so express it, on each other; each female laying several eggs in the nests of several other females, and the male ostrich undertaking all the cares of incubation, like the strange foster-parents with the cuckoo.
To this end I bent my intellect, and, after a week of profound incubation, I hatched the scheme.
And when he chose to speak a harsh thought, it was ten-fold harsher than ordinarily, because it seemed to proceed out of such profundity of cogitation, because it was as prodigiously deliberate in its incubation as it was in its enunciation.
We developed a unique set of incubations with 3 carboxyl-[sup.
Incubations were performed in a shaking water-bath at 37[degrees]C in 20-mL glass incubation vials closed with injection caps and rubber septa.
The length of the prolonged incubations observed is within the range reported for other species of birds.
AUSTIN, Texas -- Incubation Station (IS), an Austin-based accelerator for market-validated consumer product companies, today announced that all five participating companies from the accelerator's Track 1 are closing on initial rounds of equity funding and expanding nationwide.
AUSTIN, Texas -- In an effort to support high-potential Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) companies in Central Texas, Incubation Station brings together a consortium of experienced entrepreneurs, investors, and advisors to mentor early stage CPG companies.