inculcative

inculcative

(ˌɪnkʌlˈkeɪtɪv) or

inculcatory

adj
tending to inculcate
References in periodicals archive ?
5) In obstructive prevention, the possibility of the inculcation of the self-directedness of responsibility which constitutes the social meaning of reformative punishment, is denied by a purely instrumental sense of preventive "punishment" as destruction: a denial of its punishment's putatively social and inculcative purpose.
It is probably not unusual for many faculty in disciplines like teacher education, especially newer professors, to struggle with how far they should go in the classroom in "encouraging" students to reconsider strongly held beliefs, or to worry whether there is a slippery slide towards turning students off entirely or blurring the lines between inculcative and liberal functions of teaching (Warnick, 2009).
For him, inculcative purposes of education seek to "socialize [students] into existing norms and values" (p.
In so doing, the rules have inculcative value; they serve to inculcate and reinforce in prospective and practising lawyers what are the tenets of professional responsibility.
this Court has recognized that there's a legitimate inculcative role that the school board plays, and can therefore make all kinds of viewpoint .
This inculcative function and the vaguely defined student "right to receive information" were in direct conflict.
More significantly, Justice Rehnquist's dissenting opinion specifically noted the differing roles between school libraries and public libraries: "The libraries of [elementary and secondary] schools serve as supplements to this inculcative role.