incumbency

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in·cum·ben·cy

 (ĭn-kŭm′bən-sē)
n. pl. in·cum·ben·cies
1. The quality or condition of being incumbent.
2. Something incumbent; an obligation.
3.
a. The holding of an office or ecclesiastical benefice.
b. The term of an office or benefice.

incumbency

(ɪnˈkʌmbənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. the state or quality of being incumbent
2. the office, duty, or tenure of an incumbent

in•cum•ben•cy

(ɪnˈkʌm bən si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the quality or state of being incumbent.
2. the position or term of an incumbent.
[1600–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incumbency - the term during which some position is held
term - a limited period of time; "a prison term"; "he left school before the end of term"
presidency, presidential term, administration - the tenure of a president; "things were quiet during the Eisenhower administration"
vice-presidency, vice-presidential term - the tenure of a vice president
episcopate - the term of office of a bishop
2.incumbency - a duty that is incumbent upon you
duty, obligation, responsibility - the social force that binds you to the courses of action demanded by that force; "we must instill a sense of duty in our children"; "every right implies a responsibility; every opportunity, an obligation; every possession, a duty"- John D.Rockefeller Jr
3.incumbency - the office of an incumbent
berth, billet, post, situation, position, office, place, spot - a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury"

incumbency

noun
The holding of something, such as a position:
Translations

incumbency

[ɪnˈkʌmbənsɪ] N (frm)
1. (= being in office) → ocupación f del cargo
the benefits of incumbencylos beneficios de ocupar el cargo
2. (Rel) → beneficio m

incumbency

n
(Eccl) → Pfründe f
(form: = tenure of office) → Amtszeit f
(form, = obligation) → Obliegenheit f (form), → Verpflichtung f

incumbency

[ɪnˈkʌmbnsɪ] n (tenure) → incarico
References in periodicals archive ?
Wilfrid, Newbiggin Hall, before incumbencies at Warkworth and Acklington, Hatlwhistle and Greenhead, and finally St.
Married to Violet, Mr Nesham served a second curacy at Ferryhill, as well as incumbencies at Stanley and Satley in County Durham.
It's often argued, and with some validity, that Congress only knows how to react to crises, especially those that threaten members' incumbencies.