incuriosity


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in·cu·ri·ous

 (ĭn-kyo͝or′ē-əs)
adj.
Lacking intellectual inquisitiveness or natural curiosity; uninterested.

in·cu′ri·os′i·ty (-ŏs′ĭ-tē), in·cu′ri·ous·ness n.
in·cu′ri·ous·ly adv.
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References in classic literature ?
Mrs Verloc's philosophical, almost disdainful incuriosity, the foundation of their accord in domestic life made it extremely difficult to get into contact with her, now this tragic necessity had arisen.
It was a tacit accord, congenial to Mrs Verloc's incuriosity and to Mr Verloc's habits of mind, which were indolent and secret.
Literature, poetry, science are the homage of man to this unfathomed secret, concerning which no sane man can affect an indifference or incuriosity.
The intellectual virtues may seem elitist, but once a country tolerates dishonesty, incuriosity and intellectual laziness, then everything else falls apart.
A clue to this curious incuriosity can be found in Monday's surreal Cabinet meeting, when secretaries and aides took turns trying to surpass each other in their praise of Trump.
What factors have led to the incuriosity contributing to what another writer calls The Great Stagnation?
Stimulates, contribution of individuals to be responsible at their group activities infact, contribution take place while incuriosity and irresponsibility replace with feeling dependence and destiny and responsibility
The LCB's incuriosity about their origins is a striking departure from its otherwise persnickety approach.
It is precisely their inauthentic claims to have discovered authenticity that Ben targets by invoking a despised countercultural reference ('they find themselves') in a way that simultaneously evinces incuriosity towards Mexican traditions, however repackaged.
Sleep is the primary symptom of Willet's sublime incuriosity about anything other than the picturesque pre-industrial traditions commemorated by his crazily ramshackle sixteenth-century inn, a structure that itself appears to be "nodding in its sleep" (11), as though in sympathy with its proprietor's somnolent body language.
The big failing internally, and this is where Mark comes into the picture, is the deliberate incuriosity of the senior executives," said Elstein, who formerly worked for four years at the BBC.
Tacitus had already evoked the Roman incuriosity or indifference to recent history in his first work, the Agricola, whose preface constitutes an elaborate and unconventional inquiry into our ambivalence toward the present.