incur

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Related to incurred: incurred claims

in·cur

 (ĭn-kûr′)
tr.v. in·curred, in·cur·ring, in·curs
1. To acquire or come into (something usually undesirable); sustain: incurred substantial losses during the stock market crash.
2. To become liable or subject to as a result of one's actions; bring upon oneself: incur the anger of a friend.

[Middle English incurren, from Old French encorir, from Latin incurrere, to run upon : in-, on; see in-2 + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

incur

(ɪnˈkɜː)
vb (tr) , -curs, -curring or -curred
1. to make oneself subject to (something undesirable); bring upon oneself
2. to run into or encounter
[C16: from Latin incurrere to run into, from currere to run]
inˈcurrable adj

in•cur

(ɪnˈkɜr)

v.t. -curred, -cur•ring.
1. to become liable for: to incur debts.
2. to bring upon oneself: incurred our displeasure.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin incurrere to run into, come upon =in- in-3 + currere to run]
in•cur′ra•ble, adj.

incur


Past participle: incurred
Gerund: incurring

Imperative
incur
incur
Present
I incur
you incur
he/she/it incurs
we incur
you incur
they incur
Preterite
I incurred
you incurred
he/she/it incurred
we incurred
you incurred
they incurred
Present Continuous
I am incurring
you are incurring
he/she/it is incurring
we are incurring
you are incurring
they are incurring
Present Perfect
I have incurred
you have incurred
he/she/it has incurred
we have incurred
you have incurred
they have incurred
Past Continuous
I was incurring
you were incurring
he/she/it was incurring
we were incurring
you were incurring
they were incurring
Past Perfect
I had incurred
you had incurred
he/she/it had incurred
we had incurred
you had incurred
they had incurred
Future
I will incur
you will incur
he/she/it will incur
we will incur
you will incur
they will incur
Future Perfect
I will have incurred
you will have incurred
he/she/it will have incurred
we will have incurred
you will have incurred
they will have incurred
Future Continuous
I will be incurring
you will be incurring
he/she/it will be incurring
we will be incurring
you will be incurring
they will be incurring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been incurring
you have been incurring
he/she/it has been incurring
we have been incurring
you have been incurring
they have been incurring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been incurring
you will have been incurring
he/she/it will have been incurring
we will have been incurring
you will have been incurring
they will have been incurring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been incurring
you had been incurring
he/she/it had been incurring
we had been incurring
you had been incurring
they had been incurring
Conditional
I would incur
you would incur
he/she/it would incur
we would incur
you would incur
they would incur
Past Conditional
I would have incurred
you would have incurred
he/she/it would have incurred
we would have incurred
you would have incurred
they would have incurred
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.incur - make oneself subject to; bring upon oneself; become liable to; "People who smoke incur a great danger to their health"
subject - cause to experience or suffer or make liable or vulnerable to; "He subjected me to his awful poetry"; "The sergeant subjected the new recruits to many drills"; "People in Chernobyl were subjected to radiation"
run - be affected by; be subjected to; "run a temperature"; "run a risk"
2.incur - receive a specified treatment (abstract); "These aspects of civilization do not find expression or receive an interpretation"; "His movie received a good review"; "I got nothing but trouble for my good intentions"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
take - ascertain or determine by measuring, computing or take a reading from a dial; "take a pulse"; "A reading was taken of the earth's tremors"
acquire, get - come into the possession of something concrete or abstract; "She got a lot of paintings from her uncle"; "They acquired a new pet"; "Get your results the next day"; "Get permission to take a few days off from work"

incur

verb sustain, experience, suffer, gain, earn, collect, meet with, provoke, run up, induce, arouse, expose yourself to, lay yourself open to, bring upon yourself The government has also incurred huge debts.

incur

verb
To take upon oneself:
Translations
يَجُر على نفسه الدُّيونيَجْلِبُ على نَفْسِه
upadnout dozpůsobit
pådrage sig
aiheuttaaollaseurataseuraus
adósságba veri magátmagára von
kalla yfir sigstofna til
įsiskolinti
ciestiedzīvotiesiekļūt
spôsobiť
borçlanmakhedef olmakuğramak

incur

[ɪnˈkɜːʳ] VT [+ debt, obligation] → contraer; [+ expense, charges] → incurrir en; [+ loss] → sufrir; [+ anger] → provocar
I wouldn't wish to incur his wrathno me gustaría provocar su ira
I did not wish to incur his disapprovalno deseaba hacer que se pusiera en desacuerdo

incur

[ɪnˈkɜːr] vt
[+ expenses] → encourir; [+ debt] → contracter
[+ anger, risk] → s'exposer à
[+ loss] → subir

incur

vt
anger, injury, displeasuresich (dat)zuziehen, auf sich (acc)ziehen; penaltybelegt werden mit; riskeingehen, laufen; to incur the wrath of somebodyjds Zorn auf sich (acc)ziehen
(Fin) losserleiden; debts, expensesmachen; costshaben; other expenses incurredweitere Auslagen or Ausgaben pl

incur

[ɪnˈkɜːʳ] vt (debt, obligation) → contrarre; (expenses) → andare incontro a; (loss) → subire; (anger) → attirarsi; (risk) → esporsi a

incur

(inˈkəː) past tense, past participle inˈcurred verb
1. to bring (something unpleasant) on oneself. to incur someone's displeasure.
2. to become liable to pay (a debt). to incur enormous debts.
References in classic literature ?
It isn't made or trimmed," sighed Meg, faintly, for a sudden recollection of the cost still to be incurred quite overwhelmed her.
Every thought filled with apprehension for the previous treasure he had concealed in the cavern, the young man started to his feet, totally regardless of the hazard he incurred by such an exposure.
Hepzibah had no natural turn for cookery, and, to say the truth, had fairly incurred her present meagreness by often choosing to go without her dinner rather than be attendant on the rotation of the spit, or ebullition of the pot.
At all events, I, the present writer, as their representative, hereby take shame upon myself for their sakes, and pray that any curse incurred by them -- as I have heard, and as the dreary and unprosperous condition of the race, for many a long year back, would argue to exist -- may be now and henceforth removed.
Some few years before, a negro woman, who had incurred Legree's displeasure, was confined there for several weeks.
If there was anything she did not wish to grow into, it was an idiot of any sort, particularly a driveling one; and she resolved to punish herself every time she incurred what she considered to be the righteous displeasure of her virtuous relative.
Their attention and wit were drawn off to his more fortunate rival; and the raillery which the other had incurred before any partiality arose, was removed when his feelings began really to call for the ridicule so justly annexed to sensibility.
when a long way must yet be measured by my weary, trembling limbs before I could reach human habitation--when cold charity must be entreated before I could get a lodging: reluctant sympathy importuned, almost certain repulse incurred, before my tale could be listened to, or one of my wants relieved!
I had reason to believe that in accomplishing these failures we incurred a far greater expense than if we had achieved a series of triumphs.
Without having any definite idea of the penalties I had incurred, it was clear to me that village boys could not go stalking about the country, ravaging the houses of gentlefolks and pitching into the studious youth of England, without laying themselves open to severe punishment.
After ladies had packed up their best gowns and top-knots in bandboxes, and had incurred the risk of fording streams on pillions with the precious burden in rainy or snowy weather, when there was no knowing how high the water would rise, it was not to be supposed that they looked forward to a brief pleasure.
For the same sort of persons, who, in the present day, applaud most highly the deepest tragedies, were then interested in a tournament exactly in proportion to the danger incurred by the champions engaged.