incurring


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

in·cur

 (ĭn-kûr′)
tr.v. in·curred, in·cur·ring, in·curs
1. To acquire or come into (something usually undesirable); sustain: incurred substantial losses during the stock market crash.
2. To become liable or subject to as a result of one's actions; bring upon oneself: incur the anger of a friend.

[Middle English incurren, from Old French encorir, from Latin incurrere, to run upon : in-, on; see in-2 + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incurring - acquiring or coming into something (usually undesirable); "incurring debts is easier than paying them"
acquisition - the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something; "the acquisition of wealth"; "the acquisition of one company by another"
References in classic literature ?
A landsman could hardly have worn this garb and shown this face, and worn and shown them both with such a galliard air, without undergoing stern question before a magistrate, and probably incurring a fine or imprisonment, or perhaps an exhibition in the stocks.
I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and incur my own abhor- rence.
But the feelings which made such composure a disgrace, left her in no danger of incurring it.
The housekeeper and her husband were both of that decent phlegmatic order of people, to whom one may at any time safely communicate a remarkable piece of news without incurring the danger of having one's ears pierced by some shrill ejaculation, and subsequently stunned by a torrent of wordy wonderment.
Suffice it to observe, that it was a masterpiece of eloquence; and that those passages in which he more particularly traced his own successful career to its source, and warned the younger portion of his auditory from the shoals of ever incurring pecuniary liabilities which they were unable to liquidate, brought a tear into the manliest eye present.
He dared not do anything that would imply a stronger interest in a poor man's adopted child than could be expected from the kindliness of the young Squire, when a chance meeting suggested a little present to a simple old fellow whom others noticed with goodwill; but he told himself that the time would come when he might do something towards furthering the welfare of his daughter without incurring suspicion.
Ivanhoe,'' he said, ``was so well acquainted with the language and manners of the French, that there was no fear of his incurring any hazard during that part of his travels.
Let no one, whatever his rank or condition, dare to follow the beautiful Marcela, under pain of incurring my fierce indignation.
Again I felt that horrid sense of the reality of things, in which any effort of imagination seemed out of place, and I realized distinctly the perils of the law which we were incurring in our unhallowed work.
Thus, at length, by one of the unexpected strokes of fortune which sometimes befall those who have for a long time been the victims of an evil destiny, Dantes was about to secure the opportunity he wished for, by simple and natural means, and land on the island without incurring any suspicion.
But how is it that we are incurring greater risks than Athos and Aramis?
It was an affection partly filial, partly fraternal-- fraternal enough to make him like Irwine's company better than that of most younger men, and filial enough to make him shrink strongly from incurring Irwine's disapprobation.