indeclinable

in·de·clin·a·ble

 (ĭn′dĭ-klī′nə-bəl)
adj.
1. Without grammatical inflection.
2. Of or being a word that lacks grammatical inflection though belonging to a form class whose members are usually inflected.

indeclinable

(ˌɪndɪˈklaɪnəbəl)
adj
(Grammar) (of a noun or pronoun) having only one form; not declined for case or number
ˌindeˈclinableness n
ˌindeˈclinably adv

in•de•clin•a•ble

(ˌɪn dɪˈklaɪ nə bəl)

adj.
not capable of being declined grammatically; having no inflected forms.
[1520–30; < Late Latin]
Translations

indeclinable

[ˌɪndɪˈklaɪnəbl] ADJindeclinable

indeclinable

adj (Gram) → nicht deklinierbar, unbeugbar, beugungsunfähig
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References in periodicals archive ?
The monolingual dictionary contains each word with its parts-of-speech (Noun, Adjective, Pronoun, Indeclinable, Verb), phonetics and synonym sets.
Created by screening anonymous sources on one side of the vellum and randomly chosen disguises on the other, the result is cloaked in indeclinable, "mirror-image" ambiguity, calling into question the larger historical and contemporary inflections of photo-based identification.
But then in Middle English the definite article was indeclinable (as already the definite article in Old Welsh), while in German it is still fully inflected.
We define a discourse particle as an indeclinable word which is "grammatically peripheral" (Fraser 1990:391), has no or little conceptual content and may fulfil a wide range of interpersonal and textual functions.
Indeclinable, relational, sovereign in its way, the preposition is an apt emblem both for loss and for elegy's formal reckonings.
As it stands, the text must be translated 'here is the house of the master, bread also, nourishing drink better than at Bethlehem [taking the indeclinable as an ablativel: here is the house of the master'.
For Levinas, there can be no such choice because the obligation to and for the other being is indeclinable.
Note also the alternant bordo, an indeclinable adjective.
Ea in normal Old English is a feminine with indeclinable singular (hence, in my view, the indeclinability of Donua above).
The authors note that in a form like sarr-aku the base is indeclinable and not marked for gender, number, or case, so that this word means both 'I am king' and 'I am queen'.
Hence, this text might be considered a precursor to later Sanskritized Hindi, which now by and large maintains a lexical bank of certain declined participles as conventional nouns, and treats any adjective that does not end in -a (be it a Sanskrit past passive participle or a Perso-Arabic adjective) as indeclinable.
For example, many indeclinable particles must be used immediately adjacent to the words they qualify.