indecorum


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Related to indecorum: indecorous

in·de·cor·um

 (ĭn′dĭ-kôr′əm)
n.
1. Lack of propriety or good taste; impropriety.
2. An instance of indecorous behavior or action.

indecorum

(ˌɪndɪˈkɔːrəm)
n
indecorous behaviour or speech; unseemliness

in•de•co•rum

(ˌɪn dɪˈkɔr əm, -ˈkoʊr-)

n.
1. indecorous behavior or character.
2. something indecorous.
[1565–75; < Latin, n. use of neuter of indecōrus indecorous]

indecorum

1. indecorous, improper, or unseemly behavior.
2. an indecorous thing or action.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indecorum - a lack of decorum
improperness, impropriety - an improper demeanor
unseemliness - a lack of consideration for others
unbecomingness - the quality of being unbecoming
decorousness, decorum - propriety in manners and conduct
2.indecorum - an act of undue intimacyindecorum - an act of undue intimacy    
misbehavior, misbehaviour, misdeed - improper or wicked or immoral behavior

indecorum

noun
An improper act or statement:
Translations

indecorum

[ˌɪndɪˈkɔːrəm] Nindecoro m, falta f de decoro

indecorum

References in classic literature ?
Far from us be the indecorum of assisting, even in imagination, at a maiden lady's toilet
She snatched up an empty plate from the table, to represent a sheet of music, held it before her in the established concert-room position, and produced an imitation of the unfortunate singer's grimaces and courtesyings, so accur a tely and quaintly true to the original, that her father roared with laughter; and even the footman (who came in at that moment with the post-bag) rushed out of the room again, and committed the indecorum of echoing his master audibly on the other side of the door.
How grievous then was the thought that, of a situation so desirable in every respect, so replete with advantage, so promising for happiness, Jane had been deprived, by the folly and indecorum of her own family!
Allen whether it would not be both proper and kind in her to write to Miss Thorpe, and explain the indecorum of which she must be as insensible as herself; for she considered that Isabella might otherwise perhaps be going to Clifton the next day, in spite of what had passed.
There is no indecorum in the proposal's coming from the parent of either side.
Still, Shakespeare qualifies this noble brotherhood by the rather grotesque indecorum of a "pretty and sweet manner" of portraying violent, tragic deaths on the battlefield.
78r/ carry in themselves an indecorum and undecency or turpitude are contrary to this Natural Law: Such are (j) immodesty, impudence, Obsenity of Language uncleannes vagus et illicitus concubitus obsceni ponderis propalam (k) et publice depositu, pudendorum develatio [irregular and unlawful sexual intercourse, bringing forth openly and publicly what is of obscene consequence, the uncovering of private parts], Lying, ridiculous and discompos'd gestures: Those seem to be contra decorum et dignitatem humanae naturae [contrary to the decency and dignity of human nature].
Otherwise, besides the indecorum of a refusal, a prorogation would assuredly follow; which would often be very inconvenient to both public and private business.
that essential strain of coarseness, or even bad taste, or aesthetic indecorum without which writers are in danger of refainement [sic]--Flaubert had it, Proust, Stevenson (dandy, greasy locks, velvet coat) Dickens of coArse [sic], and it is fascinating to see this rough, or indecorous, or melodramatic strain emerge as poetry.
More is accusing Hythlodaeus of the literary fault of indecorum.
its indecorum, the opinion is among the purest examples of inductive legal conclusion drawing.