indefeasible

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Related to indefeasibly: indefeasible

in·de·fea·si·ble

 (ĭn′dĭ-fē′zə-bəl)
adj.
That cannot be annulled or made void: an indefeasible claim; indefeasible rights.

in′de·fea′si·bil′i·ty n.
in′de·fea′si·bly adv.

indefeasible

(ˌɪndɪˈfiːzəbəl)
adj
(Law) law not liable to be annulled or forfeited
ˌindeˌfeasiˈbility, ˌindeˈfeasibleness n
ˌindeˈfeasibly adv

in•de•fea•si•ble

(ˌɪn dɪˈfi zə bəl)

adj.
not defeasible; not able to be annulled.
[1540–50]
in`de•fea`si•bil′i•ty, n.
in`de•fea′si•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indefeasible - not liable to being annulled or voided or undone; "an indefeasible right to freedom"; "an indefeasible claim to the title"
defeasible - capable of being annulled or voided or terminated; "a claim to an estate may be defeasible so long as the claimant is under 21 and unmarried"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
It is--we say it without censure, nor in diminution of the claim which it indefeasibly possesses on beings of another mould--it is always selfish in its essence; and we must give it leave to be so, and heap up our heroic and disinterested love upon it so much the more, without a recompense.
It is true that, as a matter of formal game theory, the President can be labeled principal only if his authority is indefeasibly by Congress.
American is also seeking to use cash on hand (including proceeds of the New EETC) to indefeasibly repay the existing prepetition obligations secured by the aircraft.
ii) use cash on hand (including proceeds of the New EETC) to indefeasibly repay the existing prepetition obligations secured by the Aircraft, as applicable, which are currently financed through, as the case may be, an EETC financing entered into by American in July 2009 (the "Series 2009-1 Pass Through Certificates" (CUSIP: 023763AA3)), a secured notes financing entered into by American in July 2009 (the "13.
According to strong moral foundationalism, an agent S is indefeasibly justified in believing any self-evident moral proposition P, so long as S adequately understands P.
to think that this was all my own, that I was king and lord of all this country indefeasibly and had a right of possession; and if I could convey it, I might have it in inheritance as completely as any lord of a mannor in England.