indefensibly


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in·de·fen·si·ble

 (ĭn′dĭ-fĕn′sə-bəl)
adj.
1. Inexcusable; unpardonable: indefensible behavior.
2. Invalid; untenable: an indefensible assumption.
3. Vulnerable to physical attack: indefensible borders.

in′de·fen′si·bil′i·ty, in′de·fen′si·ble·ness n.
in′de·fen′si·bly adv.
Translations

indefensibly

[ˌɪndɪˈfensəblɪ] ADV [behave, act] → de una forma injustificable
References in classic literature ?
I descended a little on the side of that delicious vale, surveying it with a secret kind of pleasure, though mixed with my other afflicting thoughts, to think that this was all my own; that I was king and lord of all this country indefensibly, and had a right of possession; and if I could convey it, I might have it in inheritance as completely as any lord of a manor in England.
And child sexual abuse is indefensibly wrong, under any circumstance.
Choosing to carry a pistol that isn't ready to fire, or can't be made ready to fire just by gripping it, is simply and indefensibly STUPID, if you take defense of self and loved ones seriously.
THE threat by defence giant BAE Systems to axe nearly 2,000 jobs demands action from Tory ministers who are indefensibly weak on making a decisive intervention.
Yet projections of the impact of climate change on migration in Asia remain indefensibly limited in number, scope, and predictive power.
It's incomprehensible and indefensibly the reason why they are suspending the process," Mr.
To regulate food without regard to these factors, and the important steps each of them play, is indefensibly shortsighted.
Employing such an assumption amounts to extrapolation from a point, a practice that anybody must agree in isolation to be indefensibly illogical, even insane [10].
81) Again, this does not mean the Court was necessarily wrong, but its analysis was indefensibly one-sided.
But until the ASB's Statement on Auditing Standards (SAS) 39, Audit Sampling (now AU-C section 530 and the PCAOB's reorganized AS 2315), was issued in 1981, most auditors tended to avoid statistical sampling in favor of relying indefensibly on their "professional judgment"--generally based solely on their number of years' experience--to determine how many items to test in what was generally called (incorrectly) a "sample.
Indefensibly, it seems huge amounts of money are being hoovered out of a comparatively poor region to finance services run in other richer parts of the country (to their cultural and economic benefit), and those services are not felt by the people in the North East to be adequately responsive to their lives and needs.