indefinite pronoun


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Related to indefinite pronoun: relative pronoun

indefinite pronoun

An indefinite pronoun is used in place of a noun without specifying a particular person or thing that is being represented.
Both people and things can be identified in a sentence by an indefinite pronoun. Many pronouns are only used to refer to people or to things; there are also many which can be used for either.
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indefinite pronoun

n.
A pronoun, such as English any or some, that does not specify the identity of its object.

indefinite pronoun

n
(Grammar) grammar a pronoun having no specific referent, such as someone, anybody, or nothing

indef′inite pro′noun


n.
a pronoun, as English some, any, or somebody, that leaves unspecified the identity of its referent.
[1720–30]
Translations
pronom indefinit
indefiniittipronomini
határozatlan névmás
óákveðið fornafn
pronomen indefinitum
onbepaald voornaamwoord
pronome indefinido
References in classic literature ?
Having been instructed in the use of the indefinite pronoun "one" as giving a refined and elegant touch to literary efforts, Rebecca painstakingly rewrote her composition on solitude, giving it all the benefit of Miss Dearborn's suggestion.
The indefinite pronoun "no one" ends the octave, then makes its appearance in the second line of the sestet, but the last two words of the poem are "my name.
ICT is a much more effective search term than the more prevalent IT (Information Technology), which, ironically, as an indefinite pronoun and returns at least everything in the English language.
The two structures, however, are entirely different; the second is a (nominative) noun phrase (LU URU Hatti) in adjunct position relative to the indefinite pronoun kuiski, while the former is a disjunctive adverbial phrase (in the ablative case), distracted across the indefinite pronoun: URU Hattusaz kuis [ki] LU URU Ltavivaz (the LU preceding URU Luwiyaz also supports the emendation to Luwiyas).
In Little Books / Indians and Spoke there is no play with the pronoun but neither do I ever use the masculine as the indefinite pronoun.
Significantly, when and functions as an indicator for indefiniteness it can be marked by the definite article and-u, translated as indefinite pronoun meaning 'someone, anybody' into English (Baye 1996: 58).
He is on several occasions too literal about the common indefinite pronoun nescioquis, translating on 73 (LI) "some Henrician heresy that I have never heard of' for "nescio cuius haereseos Henricianae" ("some Henrician heresy or other"); and on 75 (LII) "I do not know what kind of lordship" for "nescio quod .
The indefinite pronoun ("it") noticeably recurs in her poems, and yet the "it" does not dilute the verse; rather, as in the lines above, "it" opens a door into the ineffable world of desire.
No one has used the indefinite pronoun "they" or "her.
Once again, we find two functional subtypes in this case: you either (1) entails the displaced deixis of an I [right arrow] you deictic transfer; or (2) by a different species of transfer takes on the role of an impersonal or generalized or colloquial you, in which you and your virtually lose their deictic force and become, instead, what Melissa Furrow has termed "colloquial stand-ins for the indefinite pronoun one" (370).
In the following we shall apply Haspelmath's results to the Veps language, including the semantic maps model and its elaboration, the implicational map for indefinite pronoun functions.
In the light of this typical pattern, the history of Bulgarian nesto is particularly interesting, since it seems to instantiate exactly the reverse development, namely INDEFINITE PRONOUN > THING.