indefinite pronoun


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Related to indefinite pronoun: relative pronoun

indefinite pronoun

An indefinite pronoun is used in place of a noun without specifying a particular person or thing that is being represented.
Both people and things can be identified in a sentence by an indefinite pronoun. Many pronouns are only used to refer to people or to things; there are also many which can be used for either.
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indefinite pronoun

n.
A pronoun, such as English any or some, that does not specify the identity of its object.

indefinite pronoun

n
(Grammar) grammar a pronoun having no specific referent, such as someone, anybody, or nothing

indef′inite pro′noun


n.
a pronoun, as English some, any, or somebody, that leaves unspecified the identity of its referent.
[1720–30]
Translations
pronom indefinit
indefiniittipronomini
határozatlan névmás
óákveðið fornafn
pronomen indefinitum
onbepaald voornaamwoord
pronome indefinido
References in classic literature ?
Having been instructed in the use of the indefinite pronoun "one" as giving a refined and elegant touch to literary efforts, Rebecca painstakingly rewrote her composition on solitude, giving it all the benefit of Miss Dearborn's suggestion.
The most frequently used indefinite pronoun proper in the articles of The Financial Times is "some" and its derivatives.
This rule is most useful when the simple subject of the sentence is an indefinite pronoun, like one, but the sentence contains distracting juicy nouns like peaches.
When the container is empty, the students select a sentence strip with the indefinite pronoun that best describes their winnings.
The indefinite pronoun "no one" ends the octave, then makes its appearance in the second line of the sestet, but the last two words of the poem are "my name.
In Little Books / Indians and Spoke there is no play with the pronoun but neither do I ever use the masculine as the indefinite pronoun.
Significantly, when and functions as an indicator for indefiniteness it can be marked by the definite article and-u, translated as indefinite pronoun meaning 'someone, anybody' into English (Baye 1996: 58).
Following one of his admonitions concerning use of personal pronouns, I (perhaps somewhat petulantly) replied with a letter that substituted forms of the indefinite pronoun "one" for first person singular pronouns, to demonstrate, I thought, the stilted writing style that would result.
He is on several occasions too literal about the common indefinite pronoun nescioquis, translating on 73 (LI) "some Henrician heresy that I have never heard of' for "nescio cuius haereseos Henricianae" ("some Henrician heresy or other"); and on 75 (LII) "I do not know what kind of lordship" for "nescio quod .
The main exponent of SOMEONE in Old English is the indefinite pronoun man 'someone', illustrated by (10), where the alternative form mon appears:
Age group Item 3-0-3-11 4-0-4-11 Copula + adjective 67 98 Auxiliary + progressive verb 67 88 Auxiliary + progressive verb (plural) 72 83 Irregular past tense verb 61 72 Possessive 39 39 Copula + prepositional phrase 33 43 Copula + adjective (plural) 29 52 Interrogative reversal (Is) 47 69 Indefinite pronoun + copula + negative 66 84 Third person irregular verb 56 54 Regular past tense verb 39 47 Noun-verb agreement number 24 51 Interrogative reversal (plural) 66 84 Future aspect (will + verb) 15 52 Third person singular verb 19 38 Compound subject + auxiliary 38 27 Future aspect (is + going + to) 75 61 Irregular plural + verb agreement 8 11 [bar] X [bar] X = 45.