indelicately


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Related to indelicately: brutalizing

in·del·i·cate

 (ĭn-dĕl′ĭ-kĭt)
adj.
1. Slightly at odds with established standards of propriety; somewhat improper, offensive, or coarse: an indelicate joke. See Synonyms at unseemly.
2. Lacking in consideration for the feelings of others; tactless.

in·del′i·ca·cy (ĭ-kə-sē) n.
in·del′i·cate·ly adv.
in·del′i·cate·ness n.
Translations

indelicately

adv (= tactlessly)taktlos; (= rudely)ungehörig; (= crudely)geschmacklos
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References in classic literature ?
She put it to herself as indelicately as possible, in the hope that her brain would cry, "Rubbish, you're a self-conscious fool
She was as scarlet as if he had put the thing most indelicately.
He also says he didn't consider a move in the opposite direction by "uglying up" - that indelicately named process by which an actor temporarily divests themselves of their movie-star looks to prove their commitment to a part (think Charlize Theron in Monster ).
Partly because French opponents Clermont are Europe's nearly team, or "catastrophic chokers" as Stuart Barnes rather indelicately put it.
240) Put indelicately, as one CIA officer who helped orchestrate renditions stated, such assurances were a "farce.
But the students' empathy extended into language support as they thought through translations together, predicting words for me when I was tongue tied, and smiled with understanding when my words came indelicately.
Studies revealed that traumatic events could have consequences affecting subtly, or indelicately, feelings or behaviors; exactly what those consequences entail is sometimes necessarily not understood.
Now observe how clumsily, how indelicately, how imperfectly the thing is managed--and mark how splendidly my scheme will come in to supply all the wants of the age.
Are all of these people--often faithful church members--"living in sin," as the old phrase so indelicately puts it?
They're encouraged not to pay too much attention to war's casualties and costs, especially when those costs involve foreigners with funny-sounding names (after all, they are, as American sniper Chris Kyle so indelicately put it in his book, just "savages").
Without so much as a by your leave, this gentleman swerves indelicately across several dozen oncoming cars oblivious to their screeching protests then changes his mind and returns to the first lane, evidently having twigged that he had got his turnoff wrong and needed to a bit further before doing his bee pop a hop again.