indentation


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

in·den·ta·tion

 (ĭn′dĕn-tā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of indenting.
b. The condition of being indented.
2. The blank space between a margin and the beginning of an indented line.
3. A notch or jagged cut in an edge.
4. A recess, as in a border or coastline.

indentation

(ˌɪndɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
1. a hollowed, notched, or cut place, as on an edge or on a coastline
2. a series of hollows, notches, or cuts
3. the act of indenting or the condition of being indented
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called: indention or indent the leaving of space or the amount of space left between a margin and the start of an indented line

in•den•ta•tion

(ˌɪn dɛnˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a notch or recess.
2. a series of notches: the indentation of a maple leaf.
3. a notching or being notched.
[1715–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indentation - a concave cut into a surface or edge (as in a coastline)indentation - a concave cut into a surface or edge (as in a coastline)
notch - a V-shaped or U-shaped indentation carved or scratched into a surface; "there were four notches in the handle of his revolver"
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
notch - a V-shaped indentation; "mandibular notch"
cleft - a split or indentation in something (as the palate or chin)
2.indentation - the formation of small pits in a surface as a consequence of corrosion
corroding, corrosion, erosion - erosion by chemical action
3.indentation - the space left between the margin and the start of an indented line
blank space, space, place - a blank area; "write your name in the space provided"
4.indentation - the act of cutting into an edge with toothlike notches or angular incisions
change of shape - an action that changes the shape of something

indentation

noun notch, cut, nick, depression, pit, dip, bash (informal), hollow, dent, jag, dimple With a knife make slight indentations around the pastry.

indentation

noun
The visible effect made on a surface by pressure:
Translations
تَحْزيز، تَسَنُّنتَضْريس ، إنحِناء داخلي في الشاطئفَراغ في بِدايَة السَّطْر
odsazenívroubekzářezzátoka
bugtbulehak
kolosisennys
skarî, skoravík, vogur
zaagtand
pregning

indentation

[ˌɪndenˈteɪʃən] N (in cloth) → muesca f; (in coastline) → entrante m; (= dent) (in wood, metal) → hendidura f; (in metal) → abolladura f (Typ) → sangría f

indentation

[ˌɪndɛnˈteɪʃən] n
(= mark) → marque f
(TYPOGRAPHY)alinéa m
(on metal)bosse f

indentation

n (= notch, dent) (in border, edge) → Kerbe f, → Einschnitt m; (in coast) → Einbuchtung f; (Typ) → Einrückung f, → Einzug m; (in metal etc) → Delle f, → Vertiefung f; (= print: of foot, shoe) → Abdruck m

indentation

[ˌɪndɛnˈteɪʃn] n (dent, hollow mark) → tacca; (in metal, car) → ammaccatura (Typ) → rientranza, rientro; (notched edge) → dentellatura; (in coastline) → frastagliatura

indent

(inˈdent) verb
to begin (a line of writing) farther in from the margin than the other lines.
noun (ˈindent)
(also ˌindenˈtation) the space left at the beginning of a line, eg the first line of a paragraph.
ˌindenˈtation (inden-) noun
1. a V-shaped cut (in the edge or outline of an object).
2. an indent.
3. a deep inward curve in a coastline.
inˈdented adjective
having an edge, outline etc with V-shaped cuts or inward curves.
References in classic literature ?
That will do," said the scout, examining the slight indentation with a curious eye; "it would not have cut the skin of an infant, much less of men, who, like us, have been blown upon by the heavens in their anger.
Grose took again, into the queer element I offered her, one of her plunges of submission; then I pointed out that the boat might perfectly be in a small refuge formed by one of the recesses of the pool, an indentation masked, for the hither side, by a projection of the bank and by a clump of trees growing close to the water.
Not the faintest vestige appeared of the indentation which must have been left by footsteps passing over it.
I now carefully replaced this head portion in the indentation whence I had taken it, and the resemblance to a perfect nail was complete - the fissure was invisible.
One piece, about three feet in length, had a very marked indentation at one end, while several were flattened at the sides as if they had been compressed by some considerable weight.
We rushed up to him, and there, sure enough, in a deep cut or indentation on the very top of the sand koppie, was an undoubted pool of water.
At night, one could distinguish nothing of all that mass of buildings, except the black indentation of the roofs, unrolling their chain of acute angles round the place; for one of the radical differences between the cities of that time, and the cities of the present day, lay in the façades which looked upon the places and streets, and which were then gables.
As long as the criminal remains upon two legs so long must there be some indentation, some abrasion, some trifling displacement which can be detected by the scientific searcher.
He looked at the cruelly healed stumps of the first and second fingers of his left hand, then rubbed them softly into the indentation in the back of his skull.
From a hill-top near by, where the wood had been recently cut off, there was a pleasing vista southward across the pond, through a wide indentation in the hills which form the shore there, where their opposite sides sloping toward each other suggested a stream flowing out in that direction through a wooded valley, but stream there was none.
Hump, if you will look on the west coast of the map of Norway you will see an indentation called Romsdal Fiord.
She showed the indentations made by the lieutenant-governor's sword-hilt in the door-panels of the apartment where old Colonel Pyncheon, a dead host, had received his affrighted visitors with an awful frown.