indentation

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in·den·ta·tion

 (ĭn′dĕn-tā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of indenting.
b. The condition of being indented.
2. The blank space between a margin and the beginning of an indented line.
3. A notch or jagged cut in an edge.
4. A recess, as in a border or coastline.

indentation

(ˌɪndɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
1. a hollowed, notched, or cut place, as on an edge or on a coastline
2. a series of hollows, notches, or cuts
3. the act of indenting or the condition of being indented
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called: indention or indent the leaving of space or the amount of space left between a margin and the start of an indented line

in•den•ta•tion

(ˌɪn dɛnˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a notch or recess.
2. a series of notches: the indentation of a maple leaf.
3. a notching or being notched.
[1715–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indentation - a concave cut into a surface or edge (as in a coastline)indentation - a concave cut into a surface or edge (as in a coastline)
notch - a V-shaped or U-shaped indentation carved or scratched into a surface; "there were four notches in the handle of his revolver"
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
notch - a V-shaped indentation; "mandibular notch"
cleft - a split or indentation in something (as the palate or chin)
2.indentation - the formation of small pits in a surface as a consequence of corrosion
corroding, corrosion, erosion - erosion by chemical action
3.indentation - the space left between the margin and the start of an indented line
blank space, space, place - a blank area; "write your name in the space provided"
4.indentation - the act of cutting into an edge with toothlike notches or angular incisions
change of shape - an action that changes the shape of something

indentation

noun notch, cut, nick, depression, pit, dip, bash (informal), hollow, dent, jag, dimple With a knife make slight indentations around the pastry.

indentation

noun
The visible effect made on a surface by pressure:
Translations
تَحْزيز، تَسَنُّنتَضْريس ، إنحِناء داخلي في الشاطئفَراغ في بِدايَة السَّطْر
odsazenívroubekzářezzátoka
bugtbulehak
kolosisennys
skarî, skoravík, vogur
zaagtand
pregning

indentation

[ˌɪndenˈteɪʃən] N (in cloth) → muesca f; (in coastline) → entrante m; (= dent) (in wood, metal) → hendidura f; (in metal) → abolladura f (Typ) → sangría f

indentation

[ˌɪndɛnˈteɪʃən] n
(= mark) → marque f
(TYPOGRAPHY)alinéa m
(on metal)bosse f

indentation

n (= notch, dent) (in border, edge) → Kerbe f, → Einschnitt m; (in coast) → Einbuchtung f; (Typ) → Einrückung f, → Einzug m; (in metal etc) → Delle f, → Vertiefung f; (= print: of foot, shoe) → Abdruck m

indentation

[ˌɪndɛnˈteɪʃn] n (dent, hollow mark) → tacca; (in metal, car) → ammaccatura (Typ) → rientranza, rientro; (notched edge) → dentellatura; (in coastline) → frastagliatura

indent

(inˈdent) verb
to begin (a line of writing) farther in from the margin than the other lines.
noun (ˈindent)
(also ˌindenˈtation) the space left at the beginning of a line, eg the first line of a paragraph.
ˌindenˈtation (inden-) noun
1. a V-shaped cut (in the edge or outline of an object).
2. an indent.
3. a deep inward curve in a coastline.
inˈdented adjective
having an edge, outline etc with V-shaped cuts or inward curves.
References in classic literature ?
She showed the indentations made by the lieutenant-governor's sword-hilt in the door-panels of the apartment where old Colonel Pyncheon, a dead host, had received his affrighted visitors with an awful frown.
The chairs were also damaged, many of them severely; and deep indentations deformed the panels of the walls.
The flat surfaces of the implement are marked with shallow parallel indentations, varying in depth on the different sides, so as to be adapted to the several stages of the operation.
Upon the face were many severe scratches, and, upon the throat, dark bruises, and deep indentations of finger nails, as if the deceased had been throttled to death.
From hence, the general course of the river for about seventy miles was nearly southeast; varying in breadth according to its bays and indentations, and navigable for vessels of three hundred tons.
Here were connotations of the saloon making deep indentations in a child's mind.
Perhaps had one been there to point them out to us, we might have noted indentations in the mud, but there were countless indentations, one overlapping another into a confusion that would have been entirely meaningless to us.
It had the curves and indentations in it still, where it had been twined and bound.
There was the baby too, who had never closed an eye all night, but had sat as good as gold, trying to force a large orange into his mouth, and gazing intently at the lights in the chandelier--there he was, sitting up in his mother's lap, staring at the gas without winking, and making indentations in his soft visage with an oyster-shell, to that degree that a heart of iron must have loved him
That will do," said the scout, examining the slight indentation with a curious eye; "it would not have cut the skin of an infant, much less of men, who, like us, have been blown upon by the heavens in their anger.
Grose took again, into the queer element I offered her, one of her plunges of submission; then I pointed out that the boat might perfectly be in a small refuge formed by one of the recesses of the pool, an indentation masked, for the hither side, by a projection of the bank and by a clump of trees growing close to the water.
Not the faintest vestige appeared of the indentation which must have been left by footsteps passing over it.