indention


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

in·den·tion

 (ĭn-dĕn′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of indenting.
b. The condition of being indented.
2. The blank space between a margin and the beginning of an indented line.
3. Archaic An indentation or dent.

indention

(ɪnˈdɛnʃən)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) another word for indentation4

in•den•tion

(ɪnˈdɛn ʃən)

n.
1. the indenting of a written or printed line.
2. the blank space left by indenting.
3. the act of indenting or the state of being indented.
4. Archaic. indentation.
[1755–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indention - the space left between the margin and the start of an indented line
blank space, space, place - a blank area; "write your name in the space provided"
References in classic literature ?
At the next corner we saw a deep indention in the hard stone masonry of the corner of a house, but might have gone heedlessly by it but that the guide said it was made by the elbow of the Saviour, who stumbled here and fell.
There was a very light off-shore wind and scarcely any breakers, so that the approach to the shore was continued without finding bottom; yet though we were already quite close, we saw no indication of any indention in the coast from which even a tiny brooklet might issue, and certainly no mouth of a large river such as this must necessarily be to freshen the ocean even two hundred yards from shore.
It is in pristine shape with its original box, styrofoam indention and a small pin saying "ERMA.
The group writes that, based on their experiment, "the optimal indention depth is around 400 [micro]m.
Similarly, Figures 27(a) and 27(b) show the distributions of the contact pressure in the longitudinal direction due to single indention with the 60 kN and the 90 kN loads, respectively, based on the three-dimensional, plane strain and plane stress models.
The polymer matrix corresponds to the light areas of indention (high indentation) and the dark ones, that is, low values of stiffness.
From the resulting force-displacement curve, the elastic modulus (E [sub]r ) and hardness (H) of the tissue at the point of indention (0.
Even on this date, however, there was still a dark indention into the NPC.
She stood up, smoothed the indention she had left on the bed, and went into her room.
She rips an old decorative quilt off the wall and we see an indention where a body was thrown against it.
The bone has a sharpened front to press into the buffalo hide, which leaves a temporary indention line marking where to cut the hide.