indenture


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Related to indenture: indenture deed, Bond indenture

in·den·ture

 (ĭn-dĕn′chər)
n.
1. often indentures A contract binding one party into the service of another for a specified term.
2.
a. A deed executed by more than one party.
b. An instrument or agreement specifying the terms of a bond or trust.
3. A document separated into portions so as to create indentations that allow the holders of the separate portions to match up in order to confirm authenticity.
tr.v. in·den·tured, in·den·tur·ing, in·den·tures
To bind into the service of another by indenture.

[Middle English endenture, a written agreement, from Anglo-Norman, from endenter, to indent (from the matching notches on multiple copies of the documents); see indent1.]

indenture

(ɪnˈdɛntʃə)
n
1. (Law) any deed, contract, or sealed agreement between two or more parties
2. (Law) (formerly) a deed drawn up in duplicate, each part having correspondingly indented edges for identification and security
3. (Commerce) (often plural) a contract between an apprentice and his master
4. a formal or official list or certificate authenticated for use as a voucher, etc
5. a less common word for indentation
vb
6. (Law) (intr) to enter into an agreement by indenture
7. (Law) (tr) to bind (an apprentice, servant, etc) by indenture
8. (tr) obsolete to indent or wrinkle
inˈdentureˌship n

in•den•ture

(ɪnˈdɛn tʃər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. a deed or agreement executed in two or more copies with edges correspondingly indented.
2. a contract by which a person, as an apprentice, is bound to service.
3. an official or formal document for use as a voucher.
v.t.
5. to bind by indenture, as an apprentice.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Medieval Latin indentūra]
in•den′ture•ship`, n.

indenture


Past participle: indentured
Gerund: indenturing

Imperative
indenture
indenture
Present
I indenture
you indenture
he/she/it indentures
we indenture
you indenture
they indenture
Preterite
I indentured
you indentured
he/she/it indentured
we indentured
you indentured
they indentured
Present Continuous
I am indenturing
you are indenturing
he/she/it is indenturing
we are indenturing
you are indenturing
they are indenturing
Present Perfect
I have indentured
you have indentured
he/she/it has indentured
we have indentured
you have indentured
they have indentured
Past Continuous
I was indenturing
you were indenturing
he/she/it was indenturing
we were indenturing
you were indenturing
they were indenturing
Past Perfect
I had indentured
you had indentured
he/she/it had indentured
we had indentured
you had indentured
they had indentured
Future
I will indenture
you will indenture
he/she/it will indenture
we will indenture
you will indenture
they will indenture
Future Perfect
I will have indentured
you will have indentured
he/she/it will have indentured
we will have indentured
you will have indentured
they will have indentured
Future Continuous
I will be indenturing
you will be indenturing
he/she/it will be indenturing
we will be indenturing
you will be indenturing
they will be indenturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been indenturing
you have been indenturing
he/she/it has been indenturing
we have been indenturing
you have been indenturing
they have been indenturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been indenturing
you will have been indenturing
he/she/it will have been indenturing
we will have been indenturing
you will have been indenturing
they will have been indenturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been indenturing
you had been indenturing
he/she/it had been indenturing
we had been indenturing
you had been indenturing
they had been indenturing
Conditional
I would indenture
you would indenture
he/she/it would indenture
we would indenture
you would indenture
they would indenture
Past Conditional
I would have indentured
you would have indentured
he/she/it would have indentured
we would have indentured
you would have indentured
they would have indentured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indenture - a concave cut into a surface or edge (as in a coastline)indenture - a concave cut into a surface or edge (as in a coastline)
notch - a V-shaped or U-shaped indentation carved or scratched into a surface; "there were four notches in the handle of his revolver"
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
notch - a V-shaped indentation; "mandibular notch"
cleft - a split or indentation in something (as the palate or chin)
2.indenture - formal agreement between the issuer of bonds and the bondholders as to terms of the debt
written agreement - a legal document summarizing the agreement between parties
3.indenture - a contract binding one party into the service of another for a specified term
contract - a binding agreement between two or more persons that is enforceable by law
4.indenture - the space left between the margin and the start of an indented line
blank space, space, place - a blank area; "write your name in the space provided"
Verb1.indenture - bind by or as if by indentures, as of an apprentice or servant; "an indentured servant"
oblige, obligate, bind, hold - bind by an obligation; cause to be indebted; "He's held by a contract"; "I'll hold you by your promise"
Translations

indenture

[ɪnˈdentʃəʳ] N
1. (Comm) → escritura f
2. indenturescontrato m de aprendizaje

indenture

[ɪnˈdɛntʃər] ncontrat m d'emploi-formation

indenture

n
indentures pl (of apprentice)Ausbildungs- or Lehrvertrag m
(Jur) Vertrag in zwei oder mehreren Ausführungen mit bestimmter Kanteneinkerbung zur Identifizierung
vt apprenticein die Lehre nehmen

indenture

[ɪnˈdɛntʃəʳ] ncontratto m formazione inv
References in classic literature ?
But her small boot heel did not make an indenture, not a mark upon the little glittering circlet.
The house and grounds, and furniture, were approved, the Crofts were approved, terms, time, every thing, and every body, was right; and Mr Shepherd's clerks were set to work, without there having been a single preliminary difference to modify of all that "This indenture sheweth.
Snagsby is behind his counter in his grey coat and sleeves, inspecting an indenture of several skins which has just come in from the engrosser's, an immense desert of law-hand and parchment, with here and there a resting-place of a few large letters to break the awful monotony and save the traveller from despair.
There was a great indenture in the rocks up which the sea came hissing; to the left, round the corner, the lighthouse.
Would Gargery come here with you, and bring your indentures, do you think?
And so the schoolmistress reconciled the recommendation to her conscience, and the indentures were cancelled, and the apprentice was free.
The indentures of the old members expiring by degrees, they changed their name, it seems, though they still have 'prentices among them, as well as workmen.
Then it appeared that he was the son of a north-country blacksmith, and had originally been apprenticed by his widowed mother to a lock- maker; that he had 'struck out a few little things' at the lock- maker's, which had led to his being released from his indentures with a present, which present had enabled him to gratify his ardent wish to bind himself to a working engineer, under whom he had laboured hard, learned hard, and lived hard, seven years.
Bumble, was at once instructed that Oliver Twist and his indentures were to be conveyed before the magistrate, for signature and approval, that very afternoon.
If the inkstand had been where the old gentleman though it was, he would have dipped his pen into it, and signed the indentures, and Oliver would have been straightway hurried off.
We refuse to sanction these indentures,' said the old gentleman:
B) The Notes were issued under one of two relevant indentures: the 1995 Indenture and the 1999 Indenture (each as defined below).