indexical

(redirected from indexicals)

in·dex·i·cal

 (ĭn-dĕk′sĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of or having the function of an index.
2. Linguistics Deictic.
n.
A deictic word or element.

indexical

(ɪnˈdɛksɪkəl)
adj
(Library Science & Bibliography) arranged as or relating to an index or indexes
n
(Linguistics) logic linguistics Also: deictic a term whose reference depends on the context of utterance, such as I, you, here, now, or tomorrow
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indexical - of or relating to or serving as an index
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Frege, neither demonstratives nor indexicals are singular terms; only a demonstrative (indexical) together with "circumstances accompanying its utterance" has sense and singular reference.
Prosser calls this an error through misclassification, and he argues that judgments involving most indexicals and demonstratives are either IEM or immune to error through misclassification, but not both.
Or as the scholar Gordon says the Turks have to have "an empathetic simulation that involves an imaginative shift" in the reference of indexicals, where the imaginer (the Turks) re-centers their egocentric map.
The earth as masjid, however, also forces us to rethink the indexicals.
CONSTITUTIONAL INDEXICALS AS A BASIS FOR TEXTUALIST SEMI-ORIGINALISM A.
Contributors cover such topic as synchronic and diachronic evidence for parallels between noun phrases and sentences, the development of Creole languages, oppositions from proto-Indo-European to Latin, the development of early to late Latin, the history of two Greek tenses, actionality and aspect in Hittite, imperfectivity and complete events, transitions in Portuguese and Spanish, the old Nordic middle voice, tense and aspect in Semitic languages, the verb phrase in the Kerebe language, comparative TAM morphology in Niger-Congo, indexicals in Australian languages, and differential object marking in Sahidic Coptic.
Prototypical indexicals include such language-specific deictic terms as demonstratives, pronouns, temporal adverbials, and directional/ locational adverbials, since the interpretation of their meanings is inherently contingent upon the context and/or spatio-temporal orientations of the participants at the time of production.
These are objects loosed from fixed property relations, signs that will not serve as the indexicals Sidney imagined that characters bear onstage.
When properly understood, the argument anticipates the contemporary position whereby the meaning of indexicals cannot be captured by descriptive contents.
Berkovski in his work critically examines Josef Stern's theory of metaphor, which is developed by considering the works of Stalnaker's account of context and Kaplan's semantic theory of indexicals.
According to the orthodox account developed by Kaplan, indexicals like "I," "you," and "now" invariably refer to elements of the context of speech.
The book is composed of seven chapters (including the introduction and conclusion), tackling the following issues: proper names, indexicals, definite descriptions, and complex demonstratives.