indicative


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Related to indicative: indicative mood

in·dic·a·tive

 (ĭn-dĭk′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Serving to indicate: symptoms indicative of anemia; an insignia indicative of high rank.
2. Grammar Of, relating to, or being the mood of the verb used in ordinary objective statements.
n. Grammar
1. The indicative mood.
2. A verb in the indicative mood.

in·dic′a·tive·ly adv.

indicative

(ɪnˈdɪkətɪv)
adj
1. (foll by: of) serving as a sign; suggestive: indicative of trouble ahead.
2. (Grammar) grammar denoting a mood of verbs used chiefly to make statements. Compare subjunctive1
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the indicative mood
b. a verb in the indicative mood
Abbreviation: indic
inˈdicatively adv

in•dic•a•tive

(ɪnˈdɪk ə tɪv)

adj.
1. pointing out; expressive: behavior indicative of mental disorder.
2. of or designating the grammatical mood used for ordinary objective statements and questions, as the mood of the verb plays in She plays tennis or were in Were they home? Compare imperative (def. 3), subjunctive (def. 1).
n.
3. the indicative mood.
4. a verb in the indicative.
[1520–30; < Late Latin]

indicative

A form of a verb that is used mainly to make statements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indicative - a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
modality, mood, mode - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
Adj.1.indicative - relating to the mood of verbs that is used simple in declarative statements; "indicative mood"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
2.indicative - (usually followed by `of') pointing out or revealing clearly; "actions indicative of fear"
revealing - showing or making known; "her dress was scanty and revealing"

indicative

adjective suggestive, significant, symptomatic, pointing to, exhibitive, indicatory, indicial Often physical appearance is indicative of how a person feels.

indicative

adjective
Translations
صيغَه دَلاليَّه
indikativ
indikativ
jelentõ mód
framsögu-
indikatívindikatívny
: gösterenbelirten

indicative

[ɪnˈdɪkətɪv]
A. ADJ
1. to be indicative of sthser indicio de algo
2. (Ling) [mood] → indicativo
B. N (Ling) → indicativo m

indicative

[ɪnˈdɪkətɪv]
adj
to be indicative of sth (= show) → être symptomatique de qch
(GRAMMAR) [verb] → indicatif/ive
n (GRAMMAR)indicatif m
in the indicative → à l'indicatif

indicative

adj
bezeichnend (of für); to be indicative of somethingauf etw (acc)schließen lassen, auf etw (acc)hindeuten; of sb’s characterfür etw bezeichnend sein
(Gram) → indikativisch; indicative moodIndikativ m, → Wirklichkeitsform f
n (Gram) → Indikativ m, → Wirklichkeitsform f; in the indicativeim Indikativ, in der Wirklichkeitsform

indicative

[ɪnˈdɪkətɪv]
1. adj
a. to be indicative of sthessere indicativo/a or un indice di qc
b. (Gram) → indicativo/a
2. n (Gram) → indicativo
in the indicative → all'indicativo

indicate

(ˈindikeit) verb
to point out or show. We can paint an arrow here to indicate the right path.
ˌindiˈcation noun
There are clear indications that the war will soon be over; He had given no indication that he was intending to resign.
indicative (inˈdikətiv) adjective, noun
describing verbs which occur as parts of statements and questions. In `I ran home' and `Are you going?' `ran' and `are going' are indicative (verbs).
ˈindicator noun
a pointer, sign, instrument etc which indicates something or gives information about something. the indicator on the petrol gauge of a car.
References in classic literature ?
The latter shook his head, and made a gesture indicative of his inability to reply.
Now, the remarkable point is, that the original wears, to the world's eye,--and, for aught I know, to his most intimate friends,--an exceedingly pleasant countenance, indicative of benevolence, openness of heart, sunny good-humor, and other praiseworthy qualities of that cast.
His form grew emaciated; his voice, though still rich and sweet, had a certain melancholy prophecy of decay in it; he was often observed, on any slight alarm or other sudden accident, to put his hand over his heart with first a flush and then a paleness, indicative of pain.
These opinions he delivered in a few words, in a quiet, low voice; and added, after a pause, in the tone of a man little accustomed to expansive comment, "Rather an unusual physiognomy; certainly, not indicative of vulgarity or degradation.
He maintained a hard, careless deportment, indicative of neither joy nor sorrow: if anything, it expressed a flinty gratification at a piece of difficult work successfully executed.
He shifted his indicative camp-stool from the left hand to the right, and opened his scientific batteries on the spot.
He was still a pale young gentleman, and had a certain conquered languor about him in the midst of his spirits and briskness, that did not seem indicative of natural strength.
Though his long slim legs, supporting a lank body, and his pallid skin, were not indicative of health, Monsieur de Valois ate like an ogre and declared he had a malady called in the provinces "hot liver," perhaps to excuse his monstrous appetite.
He leaped upon me with the most savage growls I ever heard, lifted me completely above his head, hurled me upon his bed, and after going through a pantomime indicative of choking me to death he stood upon my prostrate form and gave voice to a most fearsome shriek, which he explained was the victory cry of a bull ape.
The poise of the head strikes me at once as indicative of thought and power.
He was tall, had a large forehead, straight nose, a clearly cut mouth, beautiful teeth, with fine taper hands, indicative of a highly nervous temperament.
The palpitating greyness grew darker; then--though I was still travelling with prodigious velocity--the blinking succession of day and night, which was usually indicative of a slower pace, returned, and grew more and more marked.