indifferency

in·dif·fer·en·cy

 (ĭn-dĭf′ər-ən-sē, -dĭf′rən-)
n.
Archaic Indifference.

indifferency

(ɪnˈdɪfərənsɪ)
n
impartiality; lack of prejudiceapathy; indifferencelack of difference between two things in importance or characterequivocacy; ambiguitycomplete freedom of choice; absence of constraint (placed on the will) in either direction
References in classic literature ?
In choice of committees; for ripening business for the counsel, it is better to choose indifferent persons, than to make an indifferency, by putting in those, that are strong on both sides.
The true life and satisfactions of man seem to elude the utmost rigors or felicities of condition and to establish themselves with great indifferency under all varieties of circumstances.
Thus do all things preach the indifferency of circumstances.
I carried it on as far as this with a sort of indifferency that he often wondered at, more than at first, but which was the only support of his courtship; and I mention it the rather to intimate again to the ladies that nothing but want of courage for such an indifferency makes our sex so cheap, and prepares them to be ill-used as they are; would they venture the loss of a pretending fop now and then, who carries it high upon the point of his own merit, they would certainly be less slighted, and courted more.
I have in the Discription of a Law said, that it is not simply a Rule, but regula Iuncta cum imperio [a rule conjoined with authority] where by it is distinguish'd (f) from a bare (g) Rule of direction and from a bare councel or advice, But of this enough before; And this Empire of a Law consist (h) commonly in these two branches of commands & prohibitions according to the various Objects of either for as to that of permission or Lex permissivai [permissive law], it is nothing else but an omission of any thing out of a law at least as to some Circumstances of Person time or place which leaves the thing indifferent or free to be don or omitted, till that indifferency be determin'd by some human Law;
Or saw, Rather, all that remained when time and fire Had long since done their kindness, and the crime Could nestle, smug and snug, in any Comfortable conscience, such as mine--or the next man's-- And over the black stones the rain Has fallen, falls, with the benign indifferency Of the historical imagination, while grass, In idiot innocence, has fingered all to peace.