indifferentism


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Related to indifferentism: agnosticism

in·dif·fer·ent·ism

 (ĭn-dĭf′ər-ən-tĭz′əm, -dĭf′rən-)
n.
The belief that all religions are of equal validity.

in·dif′fer·ent·ist n.

indifferentism

(ɪnˈdɪfrənˌtɪzəm; -fərən-)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) systematic indifference, esp in matters of religion
inˈdifferentist n

indifferentism

a view that admits no real difference between true and f alse in religion or philosophy; a form of agnosticism. See also attitudes. — indifferentist, n.
See also: Philosophy
a view that admits no real difference between true and false in religion or philosophy; a form of agnosticism. — indifferentist, n. See also attitudes.
See also: Religion
the condition of being indifferent or of having no preference. See also philosophy; religion. — indifferentist, n.
See also: Attitudes
References in periodicals archive ?
Bishop Gleeson was merely applying diocesan policy grounded in what he called indifferentism.
When their choices concern the hot-button moral issues that the secular press announces daily will soon undergo reevaluation by the Church, Catholics grow emboldened in their moral indifferentism.
Their topics include his weird geographies; prehistories of posthumanism: cosmic indifferentism, alien genesis, and ecology from Lovecraft; his reluctant sexuality: abjection and the monstrous feminine in "The Dunwich Horror;" Neil Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald" and Lovecraft literary afterlives; and Lovecraft, witch cults, and philosophers.
For example, writing in his first encyclical in 1832, Mirari Vos (On Liberalism and Religious Indifferentism), Gregory XVI denounced religious freedom as leading to "indifferentism" towards truth, stating, "[t]his shameful font of indifferentism gives rise to that absurd and erroneous proposition which claims that liberty of conscience must be maintained for everyone.
Where this does not occur, and where the importance of the explicit presence of religion in Western culture is neglected or underplayed, or where postmodernism's tendency to promote indifferentism or unbridled relativism is overlooked, then the means by which Western citizens clarify the beliefs and values by which they live runs the risk of being obscured.
It reflects on some passages of Dignitatis humanae that dissociate religious freedom from indifferentism and point to a concept of <<law>> different from the one that underlies the condemnations of the previous teachings.
Confessional indifferentism is clearly growing among the Western Protestant denominations not only in Europe, but similarly in North America and other parts of the world.
Religious indifferentism and exaggerated individualism now threaten the traditional values which, generally speaking, bestowed meaning and harmony on the life of individuals and on the communities they composed.
154) While aspects of this "reinvention of Australia," especially an increased emphasis on social justice, were often embraced within the Church, it also witnessed a reaction by those like Kamm and his associates who saw such changes as signs of moral decay and a rise in indifferentism.
He tends to rate Lovecraft's stories by how well they adhere to the philosophy of cosmic indifferentism, calling out every apparent false note.
Thus, for Kant, all this shows that the human mind is wavering between dogmatism, skepticism and indifferentism as far as the sphere of metaphysics is concerned.
Many Asian Church leaders feel that proclaiming the unicity and uniqueness of Christ is relevant for Europe where the Church has lost out against the seductive challenges of agnosticism, secularism, atheism, indifferentism and postmodernism.