indigent

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in·di·gent

 (ĭn′dĭ-jənt)
adj.
1. Experiencing want or need; impoverished: distributed food to indigent families.
2. Archaic Lacking or deficient.
n.
A poor or destitute person.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin indigēns, indigent-, present participle of indigēre, to need : indu-, in; see en in Indo-European roots + egēre, to lack.]

in′di·gent·ly adv.

indigent

(ˈɪndɪdʒənt)
adj
1. so poor as to lack even necessities; very needy
2. (usually foll by of) archaic lacking (in) or destitute (of)
n
an impoverished person
[C14: from Latin indigēre to need, from egēre to lack]
ˈindigence n
ˈindigently adv

in•di•gent

(ˈɪn dɪ dʒənt)

adj.
1. lacking the necessities of life because of poverty; needy; poor; impoverished.
2. Archaic.
a. deficient in what is requisite.
b. destitute (usu. fol. by of).
n.
3. a person who is indigent.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin indigent-, s. of indigēns, present participle of indigēre to need, lack, be poor]
in′di•gent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indigent - poor enough to need help from others
poor - having little money or few possessions; "deplored the gap between rich and poor countries"; "the proverbial poor artist living in a garret"

indigent

adjective (Formal) destitute, poor, impoverished, needy, penniless, poverty-stricken, down and out, in want, down at heel (informal), impecunious, dirt-poor, straitened, on the breadline, short, flat broke (informal), penurious, necessitous How can we persuade indigent peasants to stop slaughtering wildlife?
rich, wealthy, prosperous, affluent, well-off, well-to-do

indigent

adjectivenoun
An impoverished person:
Translations

indigent

[ˈɪndɪdʒənt] ADJindigente

indigent

indigent

[ˈɪndɪdʒənt] adj (frm) → indigente
References in classic literature ?
A HEAVY Operator overtaken by a Reverse of Fortune was bewailing his sudden fall from affluence to indigence.
In spite of the improvements and additions which were making to the Norland estate, and in spite of its owner having once been within some thousand pounds of being obliged to sell out at a loss, nothing gave any symptom of that indigence which he had tried to infer from it;-- no poverty of any kind, except of conversation, appeared-- but there, the deficiency was considerable.
I find a source of delicious sympathy in these faithful pictures of a monotonous homely existence, which has been the fate of so many more among my fellow-mortals than a life of pomp or of absolute indigence, of tragic suffering or of world-stirring actions.