indigenous


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in·dig·e·nous

 (ĭn-dĭj′ə-nəs)
adj.
1. Originating, growing, or produced in a certain place or region. See Synonyms at native.
2.
a. Being a member of the original inhabitants of a particular place.
b. Of, belonging to, or characteristic of such inhabitants.

[From Latin indigena, a native; see indigene.]

in·dig′e·nous·ly adv.

indigenous

(ɪnˈdɪdʒɪnəs)
adj
1. originating or occurring naturally (in a country, region, etc); native
2. innate (to); inherent (in)
[C17: from Latin indigenus, from indigena indigene, from indi- in + gignere to beget]
inˈdigenously adv
inˈdigenousness, indigenity n

in•dig•e•nous

(ɪnˈdɪdʒ ə nəs)

adj.
1. originating in and characteristic of a particular region or country; native (often fol. by to): plants indigenous to Canada; indigenous peoples of southern Africa.
2. innate; inherent; natural (usu. fol. by to): feelings indigenous to humans.
[1640–50; < Latin indigen(a) native, original inhabitant (indi-, by-form of in- in-2 + -gena, derivative from base of gignere to bring into being; compare genital, progenitor) + -ous]
in•dig′e•nous•ly, adv.
in•dig′e•nous•ness, in`di•gen′i•ty (-ˈdʒɛn ɪ ti) n.

in·dig·e·nous

(ĭn-dĭj′ə-nəs)
Ecology
Native to a particular region or environment but occurring naturally in other places as well. The American black bear is indigenous to many different parts of North America. Compare alien, endemic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indigenous - originating where it is foundindigenous - originating where it is found; "the autochthonal fauna of Australia includes the kangaroo"; "autochthonous rocks and people and folktales"; "endemic folkways"; "the Ainu are indigenous to the northernmost islands of Japan"
native - characteristic of or existing by virtue of geographic origin; "the native North American sugar maple"; "many native artists studied abroad"

indigenous

adjective native, original, aboriginal, home-grown, autochthonous the country's indigenous population

indigenous

adjective
1. Existing, born, or produced in a land or region:
2. Forming an essential element, as arising from the basic structure of an individual:
Translations
indigen

indigenous

[ɪnˈdɪdʒɪnəs] ADJ [people, population] → indígena, autóctono
the elephant is indigenous to Indiael elefante es autóctono de India

indigenous

[ɪnˈdɪdʒɪnəs] adj [population] → indigène
indigenous to → indigène de

indigenous

adjeinheimisch (→ to in +dat); customslandeseigen; indigenous languageLandessprache f; plants indigenous to Canadain Kanada heimische or beheimatete Pflanzen; indigenous tribeseinheimische or eingeborene Volksstämme

indigenous

[ɪnˈdɪdʒɪnəs] adjindigeno/a

in·dig·e·nous

a. autóctono-a, indígena.
References in classic literature ?
Strictly this word is not indigenous to the whale's vocabulary.
She was a native and essential cook, as much as Aunt Chloe,-- cooking being an indigenous talent of the African race; but Chloe was a trained and methodical one, who moved in an orderly domestic harness, while Dinah was a self-taught genius, and, like geniuses in general, was positive, opinionated and erratic, to the last degree.
They are dislodged by new industries, whose introduction becomes a life and death question for all civilised nations, by industries that no longer work up indigenous raw material, but raw material drawn from the remotest zones; industries whose products are consumed, not only at home, but in every quarter of the globe.
A few of his ivory teeth deserted, though the keenest observers of human life were unable to discover to what body they had hitherto belonged, whether to a foreign legion or whether they were indigenous, vegetable or animal; whether age had pulled them from the chevalier's mouth, or whether they were left forgotten in the drawer of his dressing-table.
He looked upon all things un-European as rather more than less impossible, still he was not at all averse to enjoying the novelty of unaccustomed places, and making the most of strangers indigenous thereto, however unspeakable they might have seemed to him at home.
At this point indicated on the planisphere one of these currents was rolling, the Kuro-Scivo of the Japanese, the Black River, which, leaving the Gulf of Bengal, where it is warmed by the perpendicular rays of a tropical sun, crosses the Straits of Malacca along the coast of Asia, turns into the North Pacific to the Aleutian Islands, carrying with it trunks of camphor-trees and other indigenous productions, and edging the waves of the ocean with the pure indigo of its warm water.
That they were not the indigenous production of the region, I am firmly convinced.
Most of these houses were larger than Windy Corner, and were filled by people who came, not from the district, but from London, and who mistook the Honeychurches for the remnants of an indigenous aristocracy.
Also a few pages might have been given up profitably to the consideration of the indigenous flora and fauna of Kukuanaland.
But practically beginning with the sixteenth century, the malady of architecture is visible; it is no longer the expression of society; it becomes classic art in a miserable manner; from being Gallic, European, indigenous, it becomes Greek and Roman; from being true and modern, it becomes pseudo-classic.
He seems to be indigenous to this part of the world.
To take an obvious example, who would undertake to say that the mysterious and universal outbreak of illness, recorded in your columns this very morning as having broken out among the indigenous races of Sumatra, has no connection with some cosmic change to which they may respond more quickly than the more complex peoples of Europe?