indignation

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in·dig·na·tion

 (ĭn′dĭg-nā′shən)
n.
Anger aroused by something perceived as unjust, mean, or unworthy. See Synonyms at anger.

[Middle English indignacioun, from Old French indignation, from Latin indignātiō, indignātiōn-, from indignātus, past participle of indignārī, to regard as unworthy, from indignus, unworthy; see indign.]

indignation

(ˌɪndɪɡˈneɪʃən) or

indignance

n
anger or scorn aroused by something felt to be unfair, unworthy, or wrong

in•dig•na•tion

(ˌɪn dɪgˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
strong displeasure at something considered unjust, offensive, insulting, or base; righteous anger.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]
syn: See anger.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indignation - a feeling of righteous anger
anger, ire, choler - a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance
dudgeon, high dudgeon - a feeling of intense indignation (now used only in the phrase `in high dudgeon')

indignation

noun resentment, anger, rage, fury, wrath, ire (literary), exasperation, pique, umbrage, righteous anger No wonder he could hardly contain his indignation.

indignation

noun
A strong feeling of displeasure or hostility:
Translations
سُخْط، حَنَق
rozhorlenost
forargelseindignation
närkästys
felháborodásméltatlankodás
gremja, hneykslun
ogorčenje

indignation

[ˌɪndɪgˈneɪʃən] Nindignación f
we expressed our indignation at the demandsexpresamos or mostramos nuestra indignación ante las demandas

indignation

[ˌɪndɪgˈneɪʃən] nindignation f
to be filled with indignation at sth → être empli(e) d'indignation devant qch

indignation

nEntrüstung f (→ at, about, with über +acc), → Unwillen m(at, about wegen); to fill somebody with indignationjdn empören or aufbringen

indignation

[ˌɪndɪgˈneɪʃn] nindignazione f

indignant

(inˈdignənt) adjective
angry, usually because of some wrong that has been done to oneself or others. I feel most indignant at the rude way I've been treated; The indignant customer complained to the manager.
inˈdignantly adverb
`Take your foot off my toe!' she said indignantly.
ˌindigˈnation noun
References in classic literature ?
This was the tormented surgeon, who, after in vain remonstrating against the proceedings of the day, had betaken himself to the Captain's round-house ( cabinet he called it) to avoid the pest; but still, could not help yelling out his entreaties and indignations at times.
And I thought with some sadness that all these revolts and indignations, all these protests, revulsions of feeling, pangs of suffering and of rage, expressed but the uneasiness of sensual beings trying for their share in the joys of form, colour, sensations--the only riches of our world of senses.
But then, the other course of proceeding might end in bringing Sir Percival here in a state of virtuous indignation, banging doors also, and of the two indignations and bangings I preferred Marian's, because I was used to her.