indignity

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in·dig·ni·ty

 (ĭn-dĭg′nĭ-tē)
n. pl. in·dig·ni·ties
1. Humiliating, degrading, or abusive treatment.
2. A source of offense, as to a person's pride or sense of dignity; an affront.
3. Obsolete Lack of dignity or honor.

[French indignité, from Old French, from Latin indignitās, from indignus, unworthy; see indign.]

indignity

(ɪnˈdɪɡnɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. injury to one's self-esteem or dignity; humiliation
2. obsolete disgrace or disgraceful character or conduct

in•dig•ni•ty

(ɪnˈdɪg nɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. an injury to a person's dignity; slighting or contemptuous treatment; a humiliating affront, insult, or injury.
2. Obs. disgrace or disgraceful action.
[1575–85; < Latin indignitās; see indign, -ity]
syn: See insult.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indignity - an affront to one's dignity or self-esteem
affront, insult - a deliberately offensive act or something producing the effect of deliberate disrespect; "turning his back on me was a deliberate insult"

indignity

noun humiliation, abuse, outrage, injury, slight, insult, snub, reproach, affront, disrespect, dishonour, opprobrium, obloquy, contumely He suffered the indignity of having to face angry protesters.

indignity

noun
An act that offends a person's sense of pride or dignity:
Translations

indignity

[ɪnˈdɪgnɪtɪ] Nindignidad f, humillación f
to suffer the indignity of losingsufrir la indignidad or humillación de perder

indignity

[ɪnˈdɪgnɪti] naffront m
to suffer an indignity → subir un affront, essuyer un affront
the indignity of being handcuffed → l'affront d'avoir les menottes aux poignets

indignity

nDemütigung f, → Schmach f (liter); oh, the indignity of it!also, das ist doch der Gipfel!

indignity

[ɪnˈdɪgnɪtɪ] numiliazione f
References in classic literature ?
We were obliged for the relief of the poor and our own subsistence to sell our ornaments and chalices, which we first broke in pieces, that the people might not have the pleasure of ridiculing our mysteries by profaning the vessels made use of in the celebration of them, for they now would gladly treat with the highest indignities what they had a year before looked upon with veneration.
Here they found a single white warrior making away with their captive, and recognizing him as the author of numerous raids and indignities and believing that they had him cornered and at a disadvantage, they charged savagely upon him.
The coffin was forced, the cerements torn, and the melancholy relics, clad in sackcloth, after being rattled for hours on moonless byways, were at length exposed to uttermost indignities before a class of gaping boys.
We men of peace are taught humility, And to bear many burdens on our backs, And not to murmur at an unjust world, And to endure unjust indignities.
The indignities of stupidity, and the disappointments of selfish passion, can excite little pity.
The rising unto place is laborious; and by pains, men come to greater pains; and it is sometimes base; and by indignities, men come to dignities.
His answer indicated that for all he KNEW I might be from the Temple of Issus and in it were men like unto myself, and either this man feared the inmates of the temple or else he held their persons or their power in such reverence that he trembled to think of the harm and indignities he had heaped upon one of them.
My heart could never be with the race that had heaped indignities upon my princess and my son.
Once they seemed funny, but now only cruel, and even stupid, so that it was strange to realize his qualities and indignities as both flowing from the same mind.
She could not but note that he had offered her no indignities, nor had he been either unnecessarily rough or in any way cruel.
He awaited Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, whom he had summoned that he might heap still further indignities upon him with the intention of degrading and humiliating him that he might leave England forever.
It puzzled the man considerably that there should be two on board--this girl and Count de Coude--who suffered indignities at the hands of Rokoff and his companion, and yet would not permit the offenders to be brought to justice.