indirectly


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in·di·rect

 (ĭn′dĭ-rĕkt′, -dī-)
adj.
1. Diverging from a direct course; roundabout.
2.
a. Not proceeding straight to the point or object.
b. Not forthright and candid; devious.
3. Not directly planned for; secondary: indirect benefits.
4. Reporting the exact or approximate words of another with such changes as are necessary to bring the original statement into grammatical conformity with the sentence in which it is included: indirect discourse.
5. Logic Involving, relating to, or being the proof of a statement by the demonstration of the impossibility or absurdity of the statement's negation.
6. Sports Being an indirect free kick.

in′di·rect′ly adv.
in′di·rect′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.indirectly - not in a forthright manner; "he answered very indirectly"
flat, straight, directly - in a forthright manner; candidly or frankly; "he didn't answer directly"; "told me straight out"; "came out flat for less work and more pay"

indirectly

adverb
1. by implication, in a roundabout way, circumlocutorily Drugs are indirectly responsible for the violence.
2. obliquely, in a roundabout way, evasively, not in so many words, circuitously, periphrastically He referred indirectly to the territorial dispute.
3. second-hand, on the grapevine (informal) He'd heard, indirectly, that I was a major opponent of their plan.
Translations
nepřímo
posredno

indirectly

[ˌɪndɪˈrektlɪ] ADV [cause, refer to] → indirectamente; [answer] → con evasivas, evasivamente
to be indirectly responsible for sthser el responsable indirecto de algo

indirectly

[ˌɪndaɪˈrɛktli ˌɪndəˈrɛktli] adv
[refer] → indirectement
to be indirectly responsible for sth → être indirectement responsable de qchindirect object n (GRAMMAR)complément m d'objet indirectindirect question n (mainly British) (GRAMMAR)question f indirecteindirect speech n (mainly British) (GRAMMAR)discours m indirectindirect tax nimpôt m indirectindirect taxation nimposition f indirecte

indirectly

advindirekt

indirectly

[ˌɪndɪˈrɛktlɪ] advindirettamente
References in classic literature ?
If we resort for a criterion to the different principles on which different forms of government are established, we may define a republic to be, or at least may bestow that name on, a government which derives all its powers directly or indirectly from the great body of the people, and is administered by persons holding their offices during pleasure, for a limited period, or during good behavior.
Lecount gave me indirectly to understand that the subject to be discussed was of too delicate a nature to permit of my presence.
That is to say, they take their meals in the captain's cabin, and sleep in a place indirectly communicating with it.
Hence, after fruitless attempts to suppress such investigations indirectly by making them liable to a heavy tax, the Legislature, in comparatively recent times, absolutely prohibited them.
Van Brandt; and not a word dropped from her lips which implied, directly or indirectly, that I had pained or disappointed her.
Since he knew nothing of this, and drew his inspiration, not directly from life, but indirectly from life embodied in art, his inspiration came very quickly and easily, and as quickly and easily came his success in painting something very similar to the sort of painting he was trying to imitate.
I think that all this indirectly proceeds from the helpless perplexity of volition, in which their divided and diametrically opposite powers of vision must involve them.
This gave him a high station in his own esteem, and thus contributed indirectly to his better behaviour; for he was scrupulous as well as high-spirited, and prided himself on nothing more than on a just submission.
Now, the clergy of those days had quite as much share in the government of the country, though indirectly, as the magistrates themselves; so you may imagine what a host of powerful enemies were raised up against Mrs.
A day or two passed while he waited at his father's house for the promised second note from Joan Durbeyfield, and indirectly to recover a little more strength.
It is possible--I have often felt so much weakness in myself that I can conceive even a man of honorable disposition, such as I have always believed Lydgate to be, succumbing to such a temptation as that of accepting money which was offered more or less indirectly as a bribe to insure his silence about scandalous facts long gone by.
Eustace Macallan had expressed to them, directly or indirectly, any intention of obtaining arsenic, with a view to the improvement of her complexion.