indisposition


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in·dis·po·si·tion

 (ĭn-dĭs′pə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. Disinclination; unwillingness.
2. A minor ailment.

in•dis•po•si•tion

(ˌɪn dɪs pəˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the state of being indisposed.
2. a slight illness.
3. disinclination; unwillingness.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indisposition - a slight illness
illness, sickness, unwellness, malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
2.indisposition - a certain degree of unwillingness; "a reluctance to commit himself"; "his hesitancy revealed his basic indisposition"; "after some hesitation he agreed"
sloth, slothfulness - a disinclination to work or exert yourself
involuntariness, unwillingness - the trait of being unwilling; "his unwillingness to cooperate vetoed every proposal I made"; "in spite of our warnings he plowed ahead with the involuntariness of an automaton"

indisposition

noun
1. The state of not being disposed or inclined:
2. A minor illness, especially one of a temporary nature:
3. The condition of being sick:
Translations
وَعْكَه
nevolnost
utilpashed
rossz közérzet
lasleiki
keyifsizlikrahatsızlık

indisposition

[ˌɪndɪspəˈzɪʃən] Nindisposición f

indisposition

[ˌɪndɪspəˈzɪʃən] n (= illness) → indisposition f, malaise m

indisposition

n
(= illness)Unwohlsein nt, → Indisposition f (geh), → Unpässlichkeit f (geh)
(= disinclination)Unwilligkeit f

indisposition

[ˌɪndɪspəˈzɪʃn] n (frm)
a. (illness) → indisposizione f
b. (unwillingness) → poca inclinazione f

indisposed

(indiˈspəuzd) adjective
(slightly) ill. The princess is indisposed and has cancelled her engagements.
ˈinˌdispoˈsition noun

in·dis·po·si·tion

n. indisposición, desorden o enfermedad pasajera.
References in classic literature ?
She had an unhappy state of health in general for the child of such a man, for she hardly knew what indisposition was; and if he did not invent illnesses for her, she could make no figure in a message.
Nothing but real indisposition could occasion this extraordinary delay.
She wrote to inform her brother of the probable conclusion of a four-months' indisposition under which she had suffered, and entreated him to come to her, if possible; for she had much to settle, and she wished to bid him adieu, and deliver Linton safely into his hands.
I think she is right so far, and I frankly confess that I have exaggerated a nervous indisposition, from which she is really suffering, into a serious illness -- purely and entirely to prevent these two ladies for the present from meeting every day on the Parade, and from carrying unpleasant impressions of each other into your domestic establishment and mine.
This argument had some share in quieting my mother, though her increasing indisposition had a larger one.
In execution of the resolution which he had formed during his cooler moments, Prince John received Cedric and Athelstane with distinguished courtesy, and expressed his disappointment, without resentment, when the indisposition of Rowena was alleged by the former as a reason for her not attending upon his gracious summons.
During my confinement for want of clothes, and by an indisposition that held me some days longer, I much enlarged my dictionary; and when I went next to court, was able to understand many things the king spoke, and to return him some kind of answers.
The master of the house observing that it was now late and that Anselmo did not call, determined to go in and ascertain if his indisposition was increasing, and found him lying on his face, his body partly in the bed, partly on the writing-table, on which he lay with the written paper open and the pen still in his hand.
On entering the parlour, Delafield found George Morton seated in a chair near the fire, with his person more than usually well guarded against the cold, as if he were suffering under the effects of a serious indisposition.
Early in the indisposition of her grandmother, all of THAT had been sold which she could spare; for, with the disinterestedness of her nature, when sacrifices became necessary her first thoughts were of her own little stock of clothes.
This I feared was but too probably the case; since how could it be otherwise accounted for that I should have escaped the same indisposition, but by supposing that the bodily Exertions I had undergone in my repeated fits of frenzy had so effectually circulated and warmed my Blood as to make me proof against the chilling Damps of Night, whereas, Sophia lying totally inactive on the ground must have been exposed to all their severity.
Then my German doctors held another consultation, put on their spectacles, and told me that if I would go abroad, and take a course of the waters, the indisposition would finally pass away.