indistinction

indistinction

(ˌɪndɪˈstɪŋkʃən)
n
a lack of distinction made or perceived; the absence of making a distinctiona lack of difference or distinguishing features; the state of not being distinct or distinguishablea lack of eminence or distinction; the quality of being undistinguishedlack of clarity; indistinguishableness; obscurity
References in periodicals archive ?
We now revisit the familiar separation of the public/male/masculine and the private/female/feminine in order to explore how the inclusion of women in the military does not simply just unsettle these very zones of distinction, but rather reveals the military as a zone of indistinction.
While I am in agreement with the quasi transcendental recasting of sovereignty that Agamben accomplishes, (33) his more specific gesture of collapsing the Foucauldian distinction between sovereign and governmental power into the concept of "biopolitical sovereignty," a zone of indistinction in which human existence is produced as "bare life" and exposed to death at the will of the sovereign, is a more contentious question.
The indistinction may also be arrived at from the opposite direction.
In the German scenario, a state decision is crucial, creating a zone of indistinction in which the significance of a sovereign decision to 'let live' and a biopolitical decision to 'let die' blend into each other.
Torture may be understood within this Agambenian frame as the concentrated production of life as a threshold, as a point of indistinction between fact and law, politics and life, life and death.
Sovereign power functions, according to Giorgio Agamben, within a complex topology, a zone of indistinction between juridical and biopower.
They operate as liminal spaces, or zones of indistinction, where human rights are suspended and migrant bodies exist only in so far as they can be excluded at any time by border practices.
In fact, a closer reading of the urbe discloses a new configuration between politics and life, splitting an otherwise uniform, apolitical space of indistinction down the middle, separating it into two functional spaces: spaces of life's production (circulation and labor; exchange, communication) and those of its reproduction (the 'home'; biological restoration and sexual reproduction).
Whoever enter[s] the camp move[s] in a zone of indistinction between outside and inside, exception and rule, licit and illicit, in which the very concepts of subjective right and juridical protection no longer [make] sense.
The spaces in which prisoners and their visitors meet are 'liminal'; they are spaces of betweenness and indistinction (Moran, 2011), and by drawing on a geographical engagement with liminality, carceral geography can enhance understandings of the experience of visiting space.
Not only does he enter a state of indistinction between sleeping and waking; the stability of his own physical boundaries becomes unsettled.
Time gathers care and punishment together, oftentimes to the point of functional indistinction.