individuality


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in·di·vid·u·al·i·ty

 (ĭn′də-vĭj′o͞o-ăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. in·di·vid·u·al·i·ties
1.
a. The aggregate of qualities and characteristics that distinguish one person or thing from others; character: choices that were intended to express his individuality; monotonous towns lacking in individuality.
b. An individual or distinguishing feature.
2. The quality or state of being individual; singularity: She was so involved in the cause that she lost all sense of individuality.
3. A single, distinct entity.
4. Archaic Indivisibility.

individuality

(ˌɪndɪˌvɪdjʊˈælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. distinctive or unique character or personality: a work of great individuality.
2. the qualities that distinguish one person or thing from another; identity
3. the state or quality of being a separate entity; discreteness

in•di•vid•u•al•i•ty

(ˌɪn dəˌvɪdʒ uˈæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the particular character, or aggregate of qualities, that distinguishes one person or thing from others.
2. a person or thing of individual or distinctive character.
3. the state or quality of being individual.
[1605–15]

Individuality

 

bag Personal style; special interest or point of view; manner of playing jazz. Bag was originally a jazz term referring to a particular musical conception, style, attack, etc. By extension, it came to be applied to any aspect of a person’s characteristic style, such as one’s values, interests, motivations, or actions. It is probably an abbreviation of bag of tricks.

I dig everything about this lady, but what was her bag? (B. B. Johnson, Death of a Blue-Eyed Soul Brother, 1970)

See also bag of tricks, PLOY.

the cut of one’s jib One’s outward appearance or manner, a person’s characteristic demeanor or countenance; often in the phrases to like or dislike the cut of one’s jib. This expression, which dates from at least 1823, is of nautical origin. A jib is a triangular foresail by which sailors formerly identified the nationality of passing ships and thus recognized them as friend or foe.

a fine Italian hand A distinctive or characteristic style; subtle craftiness. The literal Italian hand is the graceful penmanship which replaced the heavy Gothic script of northern Europe in the 17th century, and is now used throughout Western Europe and America. Figuratively, a fine Italian hand may refer to that characteristic or distinguishing quality of an object or work of art which identifies its creator. In its more negative sense, however, this expression describes a cunning scheme in which the plotter’s identity is revealed through his subtle yet intrinsic design.

hallmark See GENUINENESS.

individuality

The spirit; another term for the monad.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.individuality - the quality of being individual; "so absorbed by the movement that she lost all sense of individuality"
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
singularity, uniqueness - the quality of being one of a kind; "that singularity distinguished him from all his companions"
commonality, commonness - sharing of common attributes
2.individuality - the distinct personality of an individual regarded as a persisting entity; "you can lose your identity when you join the army"
personality - the complex of all the attributes--behavioral, temperamental, emotional and mental--that characterize a unique individual; "their different reactions reflected their very different personalities"; "it is his nature to help others"
gender identity - your identity as it is experienced with regard to your individuality as male or female; awareness normally begin in infancy and is reinforced during adolescence
identification - the attribution to yourself (consciously or unconsciously) of the characteristics of another person (or group of persons)
personhood - being a person; "finding her own personhood as a campus activist"

individuality

noun character, personality, uniqueness, distinction, distinctiveness, originality, peculiarity, singularity, separateness, discreteness People should be free to express their individuality and style.

individuality

noun
1. The set of behavioral or personal characteristics by which an individual is recognizable:
2. The quality of being individual:
Translations
فَرْدِيَّه
osobitost
særpræg
einstaklingseîli; sérkenni; persónuleiki
individualita

individuality

[ˌɪndɪˌvɪdjʊˈælɪtɪ] N (= personality) → individualidad f; (= separateness) → particularidad f

individuality

[ˌɪndɪvɪdʒuˈælɪti] nindividualité f

individuality

nIndividualität f, → (eigene) Persönlichkeit

individuality

[ˌɪndɪˌvɪdjʊˈælɪtɪ] nindividualità f inv

individual

(indiˈvidjuəl) adjective
1. single; separate. Put price labels on each individual item.
2. intended for, used by etc one person etc. Customers in shops should be given individual attention.
3. special to one person etc, showing or having special qualities. Her style of dress is very individual.
noun
1. a single person in contrast to the group to which he belongs. the rights of the individual in society.
2. a person. He's an untidy individual.
ˈindiˌviduˈality (-ˈӕ-) noun
the qualities that distinguish one person etc from others.
ˌindiˈvidually adverb
each separately. I'll deal with each question individually.

individuality

n. individualidad.
References in classic literature ?
Also they made more grotesque an al- ready grotesque and elusive individuality.
Laidpore is more and more pleased with my work; he says it grows in force and individuality.
Some centuries ago, when the Sperm whale was almost wholly unknown in his own proper individuality, and when his oil was only accidentally obtained from the stranded fish; in those days spermaceti, it would seem, was popularly supposed to be derived from a creature identical with the one then known in England as the Greenland or Right Whale.
Wherefore, for all these things, we account the whale immortal in his species, however perishable in his individuality.
And each of them had an individuality of his own, a will of his own, a hope and a heart's desire; each was full of self- confidence, of self-importance, and a sense of dignity.
They said there was a marked individuality about my style--insomuch that if I ever painted the commonest type of a dog, I should be sure to throw a something into the aspect of that dog which would keep him from being mistaken for the creation of any other artist.
My friend is dead, my neighbour is dead, my love, the darling of my soul, is dead; it is the inexorable consolidation and perpetuation of the secret that was always in that individuality, and which I shall carry in mine to my life's end.
All those minute circumstances belonging to private life and domestic character, all that gives verisimilitude to a narrative, and individuality to the persons introduced, is still known and remembered in Scotland; whereas in England, civilisation has been so long complete, that our ideas of our ancestors are only to be gleaned from musty records and chronicles, the authors of which seem perversely to have conspired to suppress in their narratives all interesting details, in order to find room for flowers of monkish eloquence, or trite reflections upon morals.
In bourgeois society capital is independent and has individuality, while the living person is dependent and has no individuality.
No one now needed to "feel" him; no one mistook his front for his back; all his movements were readily ascertained by his neighbours without the slightest strain on their powers of calculation; no one jostled him, or failed to make way for him; his voice was saved the labour of that exhausting utterance by which we colourless Squares and Pentagons are often forced to proclaim our individuality when we move amid a crowd of ignorant Isosceles.
So much as they could see of the road Londonward between the houses to the right was a tumultuous stream of dirty, hurrying people, pent in between the villas on either side; the black heads, the crowded forms, grew into distinct- ness as they rushed towards the corner, hurried past, and merged their individuality again in a receding multitude that was swallowed up at last in a cloud of dust.
And in particular it may be more advantageous than any advantage even when it does us obvious harm, and contradicts the soundest conclusions of our reason concerning our advantage--for in any circumstances it preserves for us what is most precious and most important--that is, our personality, our individuality.